2017–18 Departmental Results Report

2017-18 Departmental Results Report (PDF 689 kb)

President’s message

As the new President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), I am pleased to present our 2017–18 Departmental Results Report.

In 2017–18, we continued to implement our Strategic Planning Framework, which guides our ongoing improvement efforts dealing with the changes taking place in government and in the nuclear industry. Ensuring modern nuclear regulation, being a trusted regulator, increasing our global nuclear influence and improving our management effectiveness continue to be our priorities and will guide us in regulating the evolving nuclear sector.

As the CNSC is the regulator for all nuclear activities in Canada, our work must reflect and anticipate a changing industry. We are committed to protecting health, safety, security and the environment, and to implementing Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

Among its activities in 2017–18, the CNSC provided regulatory oversight for licensing decisions for major nuclear facilities in Canada, including licence renewals for the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station in New Brunswick, the Chalk River Laboratories’ nuclear research and test facility in Ontario, the Pickering and Western Waste Management Facilities in Ontario, and the McClean Lake uranium mining operation in Saskatchewan. The CNSC also provided regulatory oversight for Part I of the licence renewal hearing for the Bruce A and B Nuclear Generation Stations.

We also participated in a full-scale, multi-jurisdictional nuclear exercise, Exercise Unified Control, in December 2017. Organized and led by Ontario Power Generation, the exercise was conducted to fulfill CNSC requirements in the lead-up to the licence renewal hearing for the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station in 2018. For the CNSC, this exercise tested our updated Nuclear Emergency Response Plan and recently renovated Emergency Operations Centre.

We continued, and are still taking on, growing work in vendor design reviews for new small modular reactor concepts from vendors who have expressed an interest in obtaining our feedback on how their designs are addressing Canadian regulatory requirements.

Furthermore, we continued to monitor and participate in many government reviews, such as reviews of environmental assessment processes, and to strengthen our approach to public participation and outreach, including Indigenous engagement and CNSC 101 sessions. These activities are ongoing as well.

We have remained committed to promoting a healthy safety culture that encourages professional and respectful scientific debate. The CNSC is a science-based organization that fosters a working environment that encourages staff to exercise their best professional judgment. The ability to raise issues is an important element of a healthy safety culture.

As I begin my term as CNSC President, I wish to thank the CNSC’s highly skilled, professional staff who are dedicated and committed in their efforts to regulate Canada’s nuclear industry and to keep Canada and Canadians safe. I look forward to working with them in the years to come. Rest assured that we will continue to be true to our goals and never compromise safety.

Electronic signature

Rumina Velshi
President

Results at a glance

Actual spending

$149,793,305

Actual full-time equivalents (FTEs)

854

CNSC priorities and results

Modern nuclear regulation: Ensure the CNSC uses science-based, risk-informed and technically sound regulatory practices that take into account scientific uncertainties, conservative regulatory decisions and evolving expectations

  • The CNSC implemented its Policy on Science in a Regulatory Environment, in continued efforts to maintain integrity in making regulatory decisions and recommendations that are informed by the use of science. The policy is supported by a number of processes that are in place to ensure that a spirit of openness, engagement and continuous improvement thrives at the CNSC.

Trusted regulator: Ensure the CNSC is recognized by the public and industry as an independent, open and transparent regulator, and as a credible source of scientific, technical and regulatory information

  • The CNSC focused on posting information on compliance oversight to the external website. This included Independent Environmental Monitoring Program (IEMP) data and desktop reviews; the CNSC published 11 IEMP reports in 2017–18.

Global nuclear influence: Ensure the CNSC leverages and influences global nuclear efforts that are relevant to Canadian interests and activities, to enhance international nuclear safety, security and non-proliferation

  • The CNSC continued its engagement with international partners through:
    • leadership of the Convention on Nuclear Safety processes
    • preparatory work for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention)
    • sustained engagement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
    • collaboration on small modular reactors with foreign regulators, particularly the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC)

Improving management effectiveness: Ensure the CNSC is a dynamic, flexible and highly skilled organization that is supported by modern management practices and tools, and responds to an evolving workforce and industry

  • The CNSC reviewed and updated 10-year workforce plans and profiles across all work units, continued to identify critical competencies for its regulatory work, and ensured that staff and new graduates have access to growth and development opportunities.

For more information on the CNSC’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) was established on May 31, 2000, with the coming into force of the Nuclear Safety and Control ActFootnote 1 (NSCA). It replaced the Atomic Energy Control Board established in 1946 by the Atomic Energy Control Act.

The CNSC is a departmental corporation listed in Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act,Footnote 2 and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources.

Mandate and role

The CNSC regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment; to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public.

Under the NSCA, the CNSC:

  • regulates the development, production and use of nuclear energy in Canada to protect health, safety and the environment
  • regulates the production, possession, use and transport of nuclear substances, and the production, possession and use of prescribed equipment and prescribed information
  • implements measures respecting international control of the development, production, transport and use of nuclear energy and substances, including measures respecting the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices
  • is responsible for disseminating objective scientific, technical and regulatory information concerning the CNSC’s activities, and about how the development, production, possession, transport and use of nuclear substances affect the environment and the health and safety of persons

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

To deliver on its mandate effectively, the CNSC continuously monitors the external environment to ensure that the organization is ready to adapt to changes that may impact its priorities. In 2017–18, the CNSC carried out its mandate against a backdrop characterized by continued demand for energy, growing interest in how the Canadian nuclear industry manages radioactive waste, and evolving expectations for public and Indigenous consultation and engagement.

Nuclear energy accounts for 15% of electricity generation in Canada. In Ontario, nuclear energy supplies approximately 60% of electricity; in New Brunswick it supplies 30%. The role of nuclear energy as part of Canada’s clean energy mix and low carbon future was reaffirmed by the Government of Canada. In tandem, the Canadian nuclear industry has focused on refurbishments of the Darlington and Bruce nuclear generating stations and licence renewal activities at the Point Lepreau and Pickering nuclear generating stations. The CNSC is committed to the safety of these projects through robust regulatory oversight while, at the same time, avoiding unnecessary regulatory delays.

The nuclear industry has, however, been impacted by surplus quantities and the decreased price of uranium globally. This has led to suspended production at the Key Lake, McArthur River and Rabbit Lake mine operations.

Canada’s nuclear sector generates various forms of radioactive waste each year, including low-, intermediate- and high-level; used nuclear fuel is considered high-level waste. The management, storage and transportation of all radioactive waste continue to be issues of concern to some Indigenous peoples, members of the public and stakeholders. This was demonstrated during the Chalk River licence renewal process, when a significant number of interventions with respect to waste and decommissioning were brought forward. The CNSC has a robust regulatory regime in place to ensure the safe management of radioactive waste in Canada, including strong oversight and enforcement of compliance with regulatory requirements.

In the wider government context, the Government of Canada proposed legislation to establish new rules for the assessment of potential impacts of major projects in Canada. This legislation would broaden the scope for assessing how a proposed project could affect not only the environment, but also health, the economy, Indigenous peoples, and society as a whole over the long term. The CNSC’s ongoing engagement with Indigenous communities also coincides with the Government of Canada’s focus on building and maintaining better relations with Canada’s Indigenous peoples.

Exacerbated by the wide reach of social media, societal changes have contributed to a decline in the public’s confidence in government, industry and experts. Government has to balance the demand for public consultation with an increasingly individualistic society. With regard to nuclear energy, surveys have indicated that the perception held by the public is linked positively to their proximity to nuclear facilities and their understanding of the sector.

Finally, technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, and a growing gap can be observed between it and government’s pace of policy and regulation adoption. These technological developments are already shaping Canadians’ expectations for interacting with government and driving much-needed reform in day-to-day business. In the context of the CNSC, regulation will need to account for any number of innovative and “disruptive” technologies in the nuclear industry in the coming years. These include additive manufacturing (3D printing), drones, small modular reactors and similar new technologies that require consideration of new approaches to regulation.

The themes above drive the CNSC’s environmental scanning, risk management and strategic planning processes.

Key risks

Risk management is a fundamental part of the CNSC’s mission to protect health, safety, security and the environment; to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public. There are three key risks, described below.

Nuclear reactor accident: There is a risk of an accident at a nuclear reactor.

While power reactors apply a defence-in-depth approach that anticipates and mitigates many potential challenges caused by both internal and external events, there remains a possibility that an event can lead to an accident at a nuclear reactor. To minimize the risk of such an event, the CNSC not only conducts robust regulatory oversight of existing facilities, but during 2017–18 complemented those efforts with the implementation of periodic safety reviews at the Bruce and Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations. Additionally, the CNSC undertook research projects to establish site-wide safety goals, which take into account the interactions between different units at a station, the aggregation of risk from internal events and internal/external hazards, and radioactive sources other than the reactor cores.

Malevolent activities: There is a risk of malevolent activities and/or diversion of nuclear materials, equipment and technology of Canadian origin.

Nuclear facilities in Canada are not immune to the same security threats that terrorist groups pose to other infrastructure and other states, especially given the strategic importance of the energy sector. Facilities adhere to stringent nuclear security requirements set forth by the CNSC and have programs in place to prevent the theft, loss or illicit use of nuclear substances. The CNSC also collaborates with domestic and international partners on this issue and adheres to the principles of the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the supplementary Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources,Footnote 3 issued by the IAEA. To mitigate this risk even further, in 2017–18 the CNSC continued to implement regulatory measures related to the security of nuclear substances (particularly of sealed sources), and enhanced regulatory control of inventories of disused and historical sources.

Lost or stolen nuclear substances and transport accidents: There is a risk of a loss of regulatory controls over nuclear substances if they are lost or stolen and/or there is an accident in transporting them.

Concerns exist over the non-malevolent loss or appropriation of nuclear substances as well. The CNSC regulates close to 1 million shipments of radioactive material in Canada every year. Several industrial and commercial applications involve the use of portable radiation devices. Medical isotopes are increasingly being produced by cyclotrons and being imported from overseas. As the use and transport of nuclear substances increases, there may be an increase in their loss or appropriation, and increased potential for transport events, resulting in an incident and/or risks to public safety. The CNSC requires licensees to have established procedures for the proper handling of such materials, and all shipments of risk-significant material are required to have a transport security plan as well as an emergency response assistance plan. In 2017–18, the CNSC’s enhanced regulatory control of inventories also helped to mitigate this risk, as did the ongoing collaboration with the Canada Border Services Agency under the Single Window InitiativeFootnote 4 , a compliance verification interface that enables electronic sharing of import data.

Given these possibilities, the CNSC maintains strong controls to mitigate risks that the organization or stakeholders may face. The identified risks are mitigated through ongoing strategies that are part of the CNSC’s planned activities.

Key risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments and any  government‑wide or departmental priorities

Nuclear reactor accident

There is a risk of an accident at a nuclear reactor.

Identified in 2017–18 Departmental Plan

Risk mitigation strategies:

  • Executed baseline licensing and compliance activities for nuclear power plants
  • Implemented periodic safety reviews (Bruce and Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations)
  • Undertook research projects to establish site-wide safety goals (see Research report summaries for 2017–18Footnote 5 on the CNSC website)
Nuclear Reactors Departmental Priority – Modern Nuclear Regulation

Malevolent activities

There is a risk of malevolent activities and/or diversion of nuclear materials, equipment and technology of Canadian origin.

Identified in 2017–18 Departmental Plan

Risk mitigation strategies:

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Departmental Priority – Global Nuclear Influence

Lost or stolen nuclear substances and transportation accidents

There is a risk of a loss of regulatory controls over nuclear substances if they are lost or stolen and/or there is an accident in transporting them.

Identified in 2017–18 Departmental Plan

Risk mitigation strategies:

  • Completed CNSC deliverables under the Single Window Initiative
  • Implemented CNSC action plan resulting from the recommendations of the 2015 International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission recommendations
  • Enhanced regulatory control of inventories of disused and historical sources with ongoing verification of licensee source inventories
Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment Departmental Priority – Modern Nuclear Regulation

Results: what we achieved

Information on the CNSC’s lower-level programs is available in the GCInfoBase.Footnote 7

Programs

Program 1.1 Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Description

This program aims to regulate facilities associated with the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear processing facilities, nuclear waste management facilities, and uranium mines and mills) to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment in a manner consistent with Canada’s international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The program regulates all the lifecycle stages for these facilities – from site preparation through construction and operation, to decommissioning (or long-term management, in the case of some nuclear waste facilities). The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are all managed through a risk-informed and licensee performance history approach. Compliance verification is conducted against established criteria consistent with the licensing basis of the facility. The results of regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system, and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program highlights in 2017–18
  • 33 uranium mines and mills inspections were conducted.
  • 47 inspections of nuclear waste management facilities and major decommissioning projects were conducted.
  • 42 uranium and nuclear processing facilities inspections were conducted.
  • There were no radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public.
  • There was one radiological release to the environment above regulatory limits.

CNSC staff use a risk-informed approach for compliance activities, commensurate with the risk associated with each facility. CNSC staff establish compliance verification plans for each facility, taking into consideration a 10-year baseline that outlines the overall risk profile across the fuel cycle. Each facility-specific compliance plan then considers the risk profile of the facility, specific risk areas associated with any activity, facility performance, modifications and operating experience.

Results

Nuclear facilities are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. To this end, in 2017–18, the CNSC:

  • Continued environmental assessments under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012), as well as technical assessments under the NSCA of Canadian Nuclear Laboratories’ proposed major projects: construction of the Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) at Chalk River Laboratories and decommissioning of the Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) at Rolphton, both in Ontario, and decommissioning of Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba
    • April 2017 – held open houses in Deep River, Ontario, and Sheenboro, Quebec, to provide information respectively on the NSDF project and the associated process
    • October 2017 – held additional open houses in both Deep River and Sheenboro, and in Pembroke, Ontario
  • Provided regulatory oversight in support of the licence renewal hearings for:
    • Orano’s (formerly AREVA) uranium mine operating licence for the McClean Lake Operation
    • Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG) waste facility operating licences for the Pickering Waste Management Facility and the Western Waste Management Facility
  • Updated and consolidated guidance to enhance clarity of the CNSC’s oversight of the long-term safety of radioactive waste management, subsequently published in May 2018 as REGDOC-2.11.1, Volume II: Assessing the Long-Term Safety of Radioactive Waste ManagementFootnote 8
  • Rolled out a communication plan on an updated risk model and 10-year baseline inspection strategy for fuel cycle facilities
  • Maintained readiness for the regulatory oversight of OPG’s proposed Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) project through participation in research; the project has been on hold pending a ministerial decision since May 2015, when the Joint Review Panel delivered its report to the federal Minister of the Environment

OPG is proposing to construct a deep rock vault in clay-rich limestone more than 600 metres underground and over 400 metres below the bottom of Lake Huron. The vault is designed to be a long-term management facility for OPG’s low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. If approved by the minister, the project will proceed to a licensing decision by the panel members, appointed as temporary Commission members, on whether to issue a CNSC licence to prepare a site for and construct the DGR.

Figure 1: Conceptual view of Ontario Power Generation’s proposed deep geologic repository

The conceptual design shows four layers, with a main shaft and a ventilation shaft. The first layer (at a depth of 400 metres) is made up of dolostone, the second layer (200 metres) of shale, the third layer (200 metres) of limestone, and below that is the Precambrian basement.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Nuclear processing facilities, nuclear waste management facilities, and uranium mines and mills are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public 0 March 31, 2018 0 0 0
Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits 0 March 31, 2018 1* 0 0
* The reported exceedance was in relation to the monthly average discharge limit for radium-226 at the Elliot Lake historic decommissioned uranium mine site for the month of January 2018. The value of the exceedance was well below both the federal guideline and the provincial standard on drinking water, with no radiological impacts to the public or the environment.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
10,096,285 10,891,883 11,227,829 10,847,005 (44,878)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
68 62 (6)
Sub-Program 1.1.1: Uranium Mines and Mills

This sub-program regulates all phases of uranium mining and milling in Canada (including site preparation, from construction and operation to decommissioning). The CNSC’s licensing of uranium mines and mills is comprehensive and covers 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas” such as design, safety analysis, radiation protection, emergency preparedness, environmental protection and equipment fitness for service. The licensing process follows the stages laid out in the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations. At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and will adequately provide for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned mines and mills, and include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily uranium mines and mills licensees. Currently, operating uranium mines and mills are located in Saskatchewan.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Uranium mines and mills are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians Percentage of uranium mines and mills facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,171,371 2,753,906 (417,465)
Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
19 16 (3)
Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Nuclear Processing Facilities

This sub-program regulates all phases of nuclear processing in Canada (including site preparation, from construction and operation to decommissioning). Nuclear processing facilities process nuclear material – either as part of the nuclear fuel cycle, or for other industrial or medical uses. The licensing process follows the stages laid out in the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations, and covers the 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas”. At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and will adequately provide for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned processing facilities. These activities include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily licensees associated with uranium refineries, uranium conversion facilities, nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, tritium processing facilities and medical radioisotope processing facilities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear processing facilities are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of nuclear processing facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,716,224 2,740,551 (975,673)

Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
24 16 (8)

Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Nuclear Waste Management Facilities

This sub-program regulates all phases of nuclear waste management facilities in Canada which process, store or dispose of nuclear waste (including site preparation, from construction and operation to decommissioning and long-term storage). Nuclear waste is defined as any material (liquid, gas or solid) that contains a radioactive nuclear substance (defined in the Nuclear Safety and Control Act) and that the owner has determined to be waste. Nuclear waste management is regulated through the policies, legislation and responsible organizations set in place to govern the management of radioactive waste in Canada, and outlined in the Government of Canada’s Radioactive Waste Policy Framework.

At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and will adequately provide for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned processing facilities. Compliance activities include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily licensees associated with the management of low-, intermediate- or high-level nuclear waste.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear waste management facilities are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of nuclear waste management facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
4,004,288 5,352,548 1,348,260

Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
25 30 5

Note: Reallocation of resources across sub-programs to meet changing regulatory oversight demands in the industry sectors.

Program 1.2 Nuclear Reactors

Description

This program aims to regulate facilities associated with nuclear energy (nuclear power plants and research reactors) to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment in a manner consistent with Canada’s international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The program regulates all the lifecycle stages for nuclear reactors (specifically, nuclear power plants and research reactors), from site preparation, construction and operation, to the decommissioning of the facility and abandoning the site (once operations are ended). The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are all managed through a risk-informed and licensee performance history approach. Compliance verification is conducted against established criteria consistent with the licensing basis of the facility. The results of all the regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.

Nuclear Reactors Program highlights in 2017–18
  • 109 nuclear power plant inspections were conducted.
  • 23 research reactor inspections were conducted.
  • There were no radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public.
  • There were no radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits.

Approximately 100 to 150 applicable compliance verification activities are selected for each year’s compliance plan. The plan is then validated by CNSC technical specialists and licensing staff, who use a risk-informed approach that considers the status, performance history, and conditions and challenges of each reactor facility, to ensure appropriate regulatory oversight and safety performance evaluation. Where necessary, additional reactive compliance verification activities are added that focus on known or potential licensee challenges. Additional supplemental compliance verification activities may also be added as necessary during the year in response to new or emerging licensee challenges.

Results

Nuclear reactors are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. To this end, in 2017–18, the CNSC:

  • Provided regulatory oversight in support of the licence renewal processes for:
    • NB Power’s power reactor operating licence for the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station
    • Canadian Nuclear Laboratories’ (CNL) nuclear research and test establishment operating licence for the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site
    • OPG’s power reactor operating licence for the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, encompassing the refurbishment project of the four reactor units, the first of which started in October 2016 and is currently in progress
  • Presented site-wide safety methodology to the Commission, to help members understand the implication of whole-facility impacts
  • Reviewed OPG’s multi-unit probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station
Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSA) for nuclear power plants
  • What is a PSA?
    • A PSA is a comprehensive and structured analysis tool used to evaluate risk at a nuclear power plant (NPP) and drive safety improvements by examining the design and operation of an NPP to demonstrate the overall safety of the facility.
  • Did you know?
    • The CNSC is leading international efforts to produce a PSA methodology for integrating the risks specific to multi-unit NPP stations.
  • Did you know?
    • Nuclear power plant licensees are required to implement and maintain a PSA program which must be updated every five years or whenever an NPP undergoes major changes.
  • The focus of a Level 1 PSA is on the NPP’s response to different internal events, which could be initiated by human error or system malfunction, and its response to external hazards.
  • Internal events may be caused by random component failures, human error, fire or flood originating from within the plant.
  • External events include earthquakes, high winds, floods, freezing rain, meteorites, geomagnetic storms, solar flares, airplane crashes and accidents at nearby industrial facilities.
  • List of icons below text: caution, fire, water, electrical hazards, floods and storms.
  • Reviewed and accepted periodic safety reviews (PSRs) for the Pickering and the Bruce A and B Nuclear Generating Stations in preparation for licence renewal hearings for both facilities in 2018–19
  • Participated in Exercise Unified Control,Footnote 9 a nuclear emergency preparedness exercise at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station
  • Continued reviews of vendor designs for small modular reactors
  • Strengthened its engagement on regulatory and technical topics of mutual interest with CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) states by:
    • holding the first technical exchange meeting with India under the Canada–India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement
    • hosting a scientific visit of representatives from Romania’s National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control
    • exchanging inspectors with the U.S. NRC so that U.S. inspectors may become familiar with CANDU technology
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Nuclear power reactors and research reactors are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public 0 March 31, 2018 0 0 0
Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits 0 March 31, 2018 0 0 0
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
39,698,384 42,826,661 44,147,591 46,375,052 3,548,391

Note: The difference between actual and planned spending is mainly due to increased spending on salaries as a result of increased FTE utilization and retroactive payments for negotiated salary adjustments.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
273 278 5
Sub-program 1.2.1: Nuclear Power Plants

This sub-program regulates all the lifecycle stages for nuclear power plants in Canada (from site preparation, construction and operation, to decommissioning and abandonment, once operations are ended). Nuclear power plants generate electricity for public and industrial consumption.  The CNSC’s licensing of nuclear power plants is comprehensive and covers 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas”, such as design, safety analysis, radiation protection, emergency preparedness, environmental protection and equipment fitness for service. The CNSC assesses licence applications to ensure that safety measures are technically and scientifically sound, that all requirements are met, and that the appropriate safety systems are in place to protect people and the environment. After a licence is issued, the CNSC stringently evaluates compliance. In addition to inspectors, CNSC staff with specific technical expertise regularly visit the reactor facilities, to verify that operators are meeting the regulatory requirements and licence conditions.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily power plant licensees: Bruce Power, Ontario Power Generation, New Brunswick Power and Hydro-Québec.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear power plants are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of nuclear power plant facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 100%* 100% 100%

* 100% was reached for the Nuclear Power Plants sub-program for the calendar year 2017. The ratings for calendar year 2018 will be finalized in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019–20.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
36,339,296 39,219,624 2,880,328
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
230 235 5
Sub-Program 1.2.2: Research Reactors

This sub-program regulates all the lifecycle stages for research reactors in Canada (from site preparation, construction and operation, to decommissioning and abandonment, once operations are ended). Research reactors help scientific research, conduct non-destructive testing and produce radioactive substances for medical, industrial and scientific use. The CNSC’s graded approach to the licensing of research reactors is comprehensive and covers 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas”, such as radiation protection, emergency preparedness, environmental protection and equipment fitness for service. The CNSC assesses licence applications to ensure that safety and control measures are technically and scientifically sound, that all requirements are met, and that the appropriate safety systems are in place to protect people and the environment. After a licence is issued, the CNSC stringently evaluates compliance. In addition to inspectors, CNSC staff with specific technical expertise regularly visit the reactors facilities, to verify that operators are meeting the regulatory requirements and licence conditions.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily research reactor licensees: CNL (the NRU reactor at Chalk River Laboratories), McMaster University (the McMaster Nuclear Reactor), and the University of Alberta and École Polytechnique (SLOWPOKE reactors).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Research reactors are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of research reactor facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 100%* 100% 100%

* 100% was reached for the Research Reactors sub-program for the calendar year 2017. The ratings for calendar year 2018 will be finalized in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019–20.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
6,487,365 7,155,428 668,063
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
43 43 0

Program 1.3 Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment

Description

This program regulates the use and transport of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment manufacturers and users and dosimetry providers, to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment, in a manner consistent with Canada’s international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The program ensures effective regulatory oversight of all uses of nuclear-related substances and dosimetry providers. It includes licensing the possession of nuclear substances, the delivery of dosimetry services, overseeing the safe transport of nuclear substances, certification of transport packages and prescribed equipment, and overseeing the certification of radiation safety officers for Class II nuclear facilities. Oversight of activities is risk-informed, depending on the type of licensed activity, nuclear substances and prescribed equipment being used, as well as the relative risk. The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are managed through a risk-informed and licensee performance history approach. Compliance verification is conducted against regulatory criteria, consistent with the licensing basis of the activity being regulated. The results of regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public and other stakeholders on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system, and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.

Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment Program highlights in 2017–18
  • 820 inspections were conducted for licensees under the Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment Program.
  • 1,889 annual compliance reports were reviewed.
  • There was one radiation exposure over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public.
  • There were no radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits.
  • 100% of independent dosimetry tests were passed by licensees.
  • There were no incidents in transport resulting in an individual receiving a dose above the limit for members of the public (1 millisievert per year).

All regulated activities have been categorized into more than 70 licence types known as use-type groups (e.g., industrial radiography, therapeutic nuclear medicine), which are ranked as low-, medium- or high-risk. The higher the risk level, the greater the overall regulatory effort required, including a higher inspection frequency. In determining risk ranking, the CNSC considers the probability of non-compliances as well as the impact of non-compliances on health and safety.

The risk ranking provides a relative order of suggested regulatory effort and subsequently dictates the inspection frequency by use type. The actual compliance effort will be influenced by available resources, as well as other factors which may affect the actual inspection frequency for a given licensee or an entire use type. An increase in required compliance effort may include but is not limited to increased surveillance, increased inspection frequency and increased desktop compliance review.

Results

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. To this end, in 2017–18, the CNSC:

  • Put Mobile Inspection Kits into operation, enabling inspectors to directly record inspection results in CNSC databases
  • Reviewed regulatory program design for hadron facilities in light of potential industry interest in pursuing proton therapy
  • Continued ongoing verification of licensee inventories of disused and historical nuclear sources; a National Sealed Source Registry improvement project is also to be completed in 2018–19
  • Participated in 19 licensee-related events, including the 13th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerators (Quebec City, Quebec), the CNSC Annual Eastern Regional Radiography Meeting (Ottawa, Ontario) and the CNSC Annual Western Regional Radiography Meeting (Nisku, Alberta)
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public 0 March 31, 2018 1* 3** 0
Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits 0 March 31, 2018 0 0 0

* In February 2018, a nuclear medicine technologist at the Windsor Regional Hospital in Windsor, Ontario received a dose to the right wrist, in excess of the regulatory dose limit. An event initial report was submitted to the CNSC by the licensee and presented at a Commission meeting in March 2018. No health effects have been noted since the incident and no physical effects of the exposure are expected.

** One member of the public received a dose above the regulatory limit. (See the note on transport incidents for further information.) The incident occurred on September 24, 2016 and was reported to the Commission on December 14, 2016. One nuclear energy worker received a dose to their hands on October 28, 2016. The incident was reported to the Commission on December 14, 2016. One nuclear energy worker received a dose to their hands on March 1, 2017. The incident was reported to the Commission on April 12, 2017.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
13,824,249 14,913,615 19,496,085 13,452,249 (1,461,366)

Note: The difference between planned versus actual spending is primarily a result of lower-than-planned salary costs because FTE utilization across various sectors was lower than planned due to delays in planning staffing.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
88 78 (10)

Note: Delays in staffing.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Medical Sector

This sub-program regulates the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in Canada as they relate to the medical sector.

The medical sector uses nuclear substances and nuclear energy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Medical applications using radiopharmaceuticals are designed to target specific tissues and organs, delivering nuclear substances to specific areas of the body. Radiopharmaceuticals are widely used in the diagnosis of heart disease and cancer. Nuclear energy (produced by nuclear substances and particle accelerators) is used for radiation therapy, to treat various types of cancers and other diseases.

Licences are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor worker and public safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment used in the medical sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of medical facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 99.5%* 98.68%** 99%

* In 2017–18, CNSC staff performed 820 Type II inspections. During these inspections, 27,653 performance grades were given out of which 27,495 grades were satisfactory and 158 were considered non-satisfactory. Any activity that is rated as non-satisfactory is corrected by the licensee to the CNSC’s standards and monitored by CNSC staff. The indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but it has been reassessed with a target of 90% for use in the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Percentage is based on total percentage of facilities licensed by the CNSC under the Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment program. No breakdown by sector is available.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,678,728 3,634,311 (44,417)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
21 21 0
Sub-Program 1.3.2: Industrial Sector

This sub-program regulates the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and prescribed equipment in Canada, as they relate to the industrial sector.

The industrial sector uses nuclear substances for various purposes, ranging from civil engineering work, measurement and control, to the delivery of services such as industrial radiography and oil well logging. These nuclear substances are found in radiation devices such as fixed nuclear gauges (that monitor production processes in the pulp and paper industry), portable nuclear gauges (that measure moisture and density in soil and the compaction of asphalt in road construction) and in radiography devices (used for materials analysis). The production of several day-to-day commodities (such as smoke detectors or exit signs in buildings) also requires the aid of nuclear substances, whose use is regulated by the CNSC.

Licences are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment used in the industrial sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of industrial facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 99.5%* 98.68%** 99%

* In 2017–18, CNSC staff performed 820 Type II inspections. During these inspections, 27,653 performance grades were given out of which 27,495 grades were satisfactory and 158 were considered non-satisfactory. Any activity that is rated as non-satisfactory is corrected by the licensee to the CNSC’s standards and monitored by CNSC staff. The indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but it has been reassessed with a target of 90% for use in the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Percentage is based on total percentage of facilities licensed by the CNSC under the Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment program. No breakdown by sector is available.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
6,029,723 5,222,924 (806,799)

Note: Lower than planned salary costs from lower than planned FTE utilization due to delays in planned staffing.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
36 30 (6)

Note: Delays in staffing.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Commercial Sector

This sub-program regulates the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and prescribed equipment in Canada, as they relate to the commercial sector.

The commercial sector focuses primarily on the production and sale of nuclear substances and the third-party servicing and distribution of radiation devices and other prescribed equipment (such as particle accelerators). Nuclear substances are found in many products used to protect the health and safety of Canadians (including smoke detectors, self-lighting exit signs and security-screening equipment). Such devices may not require a licence for possession by the end-user; however, their manufacturing and initial distribution in Canada are licensed by the CNSC.

Licences are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment used in the commercial sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of commercial facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 99.5%* 98.68%** 99%

* In 2017–18, CNSC staff performed 820 Type II inspections. During these inspections, 27,653 performance grades were given out of which 27,495 grades were satisfactory and 158 were considered non-satisfactory. Any activity that is rated as non-satisfactory is corrected by the licensee to the CNSC’s standards and monitored by CNSC staff. The indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but it has been reassessed with a target of 90% for use in the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Percentage is based on total percentage of facilities licensed by the CNSC under the Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment program. No breakdown by sector is available.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,548,122 1,333,855 (214,267)

Note: Lower than planned salary costs from lower than planned FTE utilization due to delays in planned staffing.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
10 8 (2)

Note: Delays in staffing.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Academic and Research Sector

This sub-program regulates the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in Canada, as they relate to the academic and research sector.

The academic and research sector focuses primarily on biological and biomedical research with open-source radioisotopes. The sector also employs research particle accelerators and research irradiators. Nuclear substances found in the academic field include those used in irradiators (which irradiate cells or samples in research laboratories). Particle accelerators are used for research in the fields of subatomic physics, materials and biomedicine and may also generate some nuclear materials for medical and research facilities. Nuclear substances are used in teaching and research laboratories for diverse activities such as gas chromatography, which analyzes environmental samples.

Licences are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment for use in the academic and research sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Percentage of academic and research facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above 100% March 31, 2018 99.5%* 98.68%** 99%

* In 2017–18, CNSC staff performed 820 Type II inspections. During these inspections, 27,653 performance grades were given out of which 27,495 grades were satisfactory and 158 were considered non-satisfactory. Any activity that is rated as non-satisfactory is corrected by the licensee to the CNSC’s standards and monitored by CNSC staff. The indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but it has been reassessed with a target of 90% for use in the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Percentage is based on total percentage of facilities licensed by the CNSC under the Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment program. No breakdown by sector is available.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,319,028 1,125,138 (193,890)

Note: Lower than planned salary costs from lower than planned FTE utilization due to delays in planned staffing.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
7 6 (1)

Note: Delays in staffing.

Sub-Program 1.3.5: Packaging and Transport

This sub-program regulates the packaging and transport of nuclear substances in Canada. The CNSC’s packaging and transport regulations are based on international transport regulations published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ensuring a high level of safety of persons and of the environment.

The CNSC certifies package designs requiring competent authority approval in Canada and worldwide, and requires the registration of the package user prior to their use in Canada, as a way of ensuring the safe packaging and transport of nuclear substances. Other regulatory requirements (such as labelling, documentation, quality assurance program and radiation protection program for carriers) exist to further strengthen transport safety.

The CNSC issues transport licences for specific circumstances; however, transport activities are generally exempt from CNSC licensing. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear substances are packaged and transported safely to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment Number of incidents in transport resulting in an individual receiving a dose above the limit for members of the public of one millisievert per year 0 March 31, 2018 0 1* 0

* Members of the public received unnecessary doses as a result of being passengers in a vehicle that was also transporting packages containing nuclear substances in non-compliance with regulatory requirements. This incident was presented to the Commission on December 14, 2016.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
2,102,576 1,991,582 (110,994)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
13 12 (1)
Sub-Program 1.3.6: Dosimetry Services

This sub-program licenses dosimetry service providers under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and the Radiation Protection Regulations made under the Act. Each dosimetry service provider must meet the technical and quality assurance requirements outlined in the CNSC’s Technical and Quality Assurance Standards for Dosimetry Services. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Dosimetry service providers are either commercial service providers (which service external clients) or in-house service providers (which are nuclear licensees with the capability of providing dosimetry services for their own employees and visitors).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Dosimetry services are regulated to protect the health and safety of nuclear energy workers Percentage of independent tests passed by licensees 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100%

External radiation: 100%

Internal radiation: 98%

Radon progeny: 100%*

* External radiation: independent test for dosimeters that are used to measure doses associated with external exposure to radiation.

Internal radiation: independent test for in vitro and in vivo measurements associated with internal exposure to radiation.

Radon progeny: independent test for instruments that measure exposure to radon progeny.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
235,438 144,439 (90,999)

Note: Lower than planned salary costs from lower than planned FTE utilization due to delays in planned staffing.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
1 1 0

Program 1.4 Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Description

This program aims to provide assurance to both the Canadian public and the international community that the development, production and use of nuclear energy and nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information is safe and conforms with the control measures and international obligations to which Canada has agreed, including those under the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Under its mandate, the CNSC implements measures of control respecting nuclear non-proliferation, including domestic and international arrangements, IAEA safeguards, and import-export of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information.

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Program highlights in 2017–18
  • 977 import and export licences were issued.
  • 5 inspections of import and export licensees were conducted.
  • 60 safeguards inspections were led by the International Atomic Energy Agency.
  • 7 safeguards inspections were led by the CNSC.
  • 53 additional protocol declarations were made.
  • The IAEA’s safeguards broader conclusion was maintained for 2017.
Results

The Canadian public and the international community are assured that nuclear energy, nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information are used for peaceful purposes, and do not contribute to threats to nuclear non-proliferation and radiological safety or security. To this end, in 2017–18, the CNSC:

  • Implemented the Single Window Initiative,Footnote 12 a compliance verification interface that enables electronic sharing of import data, with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA); currently working with CBSA to assist in the onboarding of brokers and licensees

The CNSC was the first nuclear regulator among the G7 countries to develop a national registry and to implement a Web-based tracking system, along with enhanced import and export controls, for high-risk radioactive sealed sources.

Figure 2. IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria (Vienna International Centre)

  • Collaborated with the IAEA and licensees (Cameco and CNL) in developing a neutron-detector portal monitor, for the transfer of materials subject to safeguards from Cameco’s Port Hope conversion facility to CNL’s Long Term Waste Management Facility
  • Held an annual meeting with Global Affairs Canada, identifying specific areas to deepen collaboration (e.g., IAEA training material on the security of radioactive materials during transport; forensics; specific countries of interest)
  • Led two multi-departmental R&D and capability development projects aimed at enhancing and expanding Canada’s national nuclear forensics capability
    • the first project, the Nuclear Forensics Capability Advancement Project, is scheduled to conclude by the end of March 2019
    • the second project, the Nuclear Material Signature and Provenance Assessment Capability Development Project, is scheduled to conclude in March 2020
  • Developed criteria for staff participation in international peer review missions, including a requirement for the host Member State to make the review, and its follow-up, publicly available
  • Worked with the IAEA and Canadian nuclear operators to define updated safeguards measures for Canadian facilities and ensure that nuclear material inventories and transfers remain subject to robust verification
    • the new approach, which is expected to be fully implemented over the next two years, is anticipated to include additional equipment-based approaches for safeguards that will strengthen safeguards without additional inspector presence
  • Published the first comprehensive safeguards regulatory document that includes all safeguards obligations and guidance, REGDOC-2.13.1, Safeguards and Nuclear Material Accountancy;Footnote 13 the resulting document will serve as a new basis for the evolution of safeguards compliance in Canada
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Assurance to the Canadian public and international community that nuclear energy, nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information are used for peaceful purposes, and do not contribute to threats to nuclear non-proliferation and radiological safety or security Maintain IAEA safeguards broader conclusion (the IAEA concludes that there was no diversion of declared nuclear material, and no indication of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activity) 100%* June 30, 2018 100% 100% 100%

* 100% refers to the IAEA broader conclusion being maintained for that year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
5,937,337 6,405,206 6,602,765 4,920,301 (1,484,905)

Note: The difference between planned and actual spending in this program is mainly a result of lower spending for the Canadian Safeguards and Support Program; reduced spending on salaries due to lower than planned FTE utilization; and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
40 29 (11)

Note: Delays in staffing and reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight activities and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Sub-Program 1.4.1: Domestic and International Arrangements

This sub-program establishes and maintains domestic and international arrangements – in collaboration with other organizations within Canada and abroad – to implement measures of control and international obligations to which Canada has agreed.

The CNSC negotiates administrative arrangements with domestic and international organizations to align regulatory systems and processes, to comply with and maintain international commitments, and to implement measures pursuant to Canada’s nuclear non-proliferation policy. These measures include bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with Canada’s nuclear trading partners. The CNSC is also responsible for the administration and implementation of the nuclear security programs, and other supporting nuclear security requirements and guidance related to domestic and international activities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Establish, maintain and implement domestic and international arrangements concerning the control of nuclear energy, including those pertaining to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, the international transfer of nuclear goods, and regulatory cooperation on nuclear safety Percentage of annual inventory reports of Canadian obligated nuclear goods and technology that are confirmed as meeting CNSC requirements 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,297,004 1,086,037 (210,967)

Note: Reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight demands and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
7 6 (1)

Note: Delays in staffing and reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight activities and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Sub-Program 1.4.2: Safeguards

This sub-program activity area maintains the IAEA’s broader conclusion for Canada, by ensuring that Canada’s obligations under the Canada–IAEA safeguards agreements are met. The broader conclusion is a statement by the IAEA that over a given year there was no diversion of declared nuclear material and no indication of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activity. The Safeguards Agreement (1972) and the Additional Protocol (2000) are treaty-level instruments between the Government of Canada and the IAEA requiring Canada to accept and facilitate IAEA safeguards on all nuclear material and certain specific nuclear activities. The signing of the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA was required by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, while the Additional Protocol is a voluntary safeguards-strengthening instrument signed by nearly all major nuclear states.

The CNSC strives to maintain the IAEA broader conclusion for Canada – achieved annually since 2005 – to provide assurances to Canadians and the world community of the absence of undeclared nuclear materials and activities in Canada. The annual statement of the broader safeguards conclusion allows the IAEA to adjust its technical objectives for Canada, reducing the national overall inspection effort while also maintaining effective safeguards implementation.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Provide assurance to Canadians and the international community on the absence of declared nuclear material diversion, and the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Canada Percentage of nuclear material reports submitted that are confirmed as meeting requirements with Canada’s international commitments 100% March 31, 2018 98.2%* 100% 99%**

* Two licensees submitted late reports to the CNSC in 2017–18. As a consequence, the CNSC was one day late in submitting its reports to the IAEA. The lateness of reports did not impact the IAEA’s ability to draw its safeguards conclusions for Canada.

** All required reports to the IAEA were submitted; however, nine such reports were delayed. To improve performance, steps are being taken to ensure that licensees submit their reports on time. Improvements to the electronic nuclear material reporting and accounting systems and to internal processes are also being undertaken.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,454,598 863,344 (591,254)

Note: Reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight demands and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
7 5 (2)

Note: Delays in staffing and reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight activities and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Sub-Program 1.4.3: Import-Export

This sub-program activity area establishes and administers controls on imports and exports of nuclear substances, equipment and information through licensing, compliance and counter-proliferation measures. The objective is to assure that nuclear goods and technology are transferred internationally solely for peaceful purposes, and do not contribute to non-proliferation or radiological security threats. Controls are implemented consistent with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, other relevant national legislation, international standards and guidelines to which Canada adheres (e.g., Nuclear Suppliers Group Guidelines, IAEA codes of conduct) and Canadian nuclear non-proliferation policy (e.g., Nuclear Cooperation Agreement provisions).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Nuclear goods are exported solely for peaceful purposes Percentage of goods exported solely for peaceful purposes 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,653,604 2,970,920 (682,684)

Note: Reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight demands and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
26 18 (8)

Note: Delays in staffing and reallocation of resources due to shift in regulatory oversight activities and a review of activities subject to cost recovery.

Program 1.5 Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information

Description

This program aims to inform the Canadian public – including Canadian nuclear licensees, vendors, academic community, special interest groups, Indigenous groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions and international organizations – that nuclear facilities and activities are being used safely, in adherence to regulatory requirements and best available scientific and technical information. This program is realized through the processes of generating scientific and technical information, institutionalizing the information within the regulatory framework, and disseminating the information through a variety of channels and engagement practices.

Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program highlights in 2017–18
  • 17 research projects were funded.
  • 41 papers published and conference presentations made by CNSC staff.
  • 34 separate recipients were awarded funding under the Participant Funding Program.
  • 1,400 public inquiries were made to the CNSC’s info account.
  • 20 Indigenous groups had meetings with the CNSC.
  • CNSC Web pages related to the Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program were viewed 17,912 times.
Results

Scientific, technical and regulatory information is delivered to inform the Canadian public about the effectiveness of Canada’s nuclear regulatory regime. To this end, in 2017–18 the CNSC:

Figure 3. What makes up the CNSC’s regulatory framework?

  • Published REGDOC-2.2.4, Fitness for Duty, Volume II: Managing Alcohol and Drug Use, version 2,Footnote 15 which makes the CNSC the first regulator in Canada to require random drug and alcohol testing for a specified worker population
  • Human performance is a key contributor to the safety and security of nuclear facilities, and the adoption of measures that monitor alcohol and drug use is a key component of ensuring worker fitness for duty.

  • Expanded online public access to documents submitted for Commission proceedings
  • Published Regulatory Framework PlanFootnote 16 2017–22, which sets out the regulations and regulatory documents that the CNSC plans to develop or amend in the coming five years
    • CNSC documents are reviewed periodically to determine if they are still appropriate or need to be updated
  • Published or completed 12 regulatory documents and 1 discussion paper
  • Completed a comprehensive review of the 5-year Regulatory Framework PlanFootnote 16 for 2018–19 to 2023–24
  • Continued engagement within the organization to ensure that the CNSC 101 Program is flexible and meets the expectations of stakeholders
  • Implemented initial modules of new software for CNSC work processes, to manage workflow and related information for licensing, certification and compliance activities
  • Awarded more than $640,000 to 34 different recipients through the CNSC’s Participant Funding Program (PFP)
    • this included funding to 12 Indigenous communities or organizations to support participation in CNSC regulatory processes, to learn more about the CNSC’s regulation of the nuclear sector in Canada and the performance of CNSC-regulated facilities, and to appear before the Commission to share their findings and perspectives
Figure 5 Logo for the CNSC’s Participant Funding Program
  • Completed a capability catalogue on current expertise and research infrastructure, internal and external to the CNSC, identifying and assessing required capabilities, potential gaps and remedial steps
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Scientific, technical and regulatory information is delivered to inform the Canadian public on the effectiveness of Canada’s nuclear regulatory regime

Number of views of CNSC Web pages related to this program TBD* TBD* 17,912 16,321** 5,247,516**
Number of public requests for information (non-Access to Information and Privacy) or outreach support TBD* TBD* 1,400 1,700 1,521

* This indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports.

** The CNSC refined its methodology for page views, which explains the difference between the 2015–16 and 2016–17 Actual results.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
26,494,116 28,581,883 29,265,079 27,089,234 (1,492,649)

Note: The difference between planned and actual spending is primarily due to a decrease in actual spending in the Scientific and Technical Information sub-program due to reduced spending on salaries as a result of a shift in regulatory oversight demands.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
154 138 (16)

Note: Decrease in the Scientific and Technical Information sub-program as a result of a shift in regulatory oversight demands.

Sub-Program 1.5.1: Regulatory Framework

This sub-program develops and makes improvements to the CNSC’s regulatory framework. The regulatory framework includes the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations, regulatory documents outlining requirements and guidance, and nuclear standards developed by the CSA Group (formerly the Canadian Standards Association). The framework also takes into account Government of Canada regulatory policy guidance, as well as the views of stakeholders and the general public.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Regulatory requirements and guidance support nuclear safety  

Licensee views on clarity of the regulatory framework

Percentage of licensees, broken down by service line and sub-program, agreeing that the regulatory framework is clear (based on survey focus group of individuals responsible for license submissions)

TBD* TBD* N/A** N/A** N/A**

* This indicator was developed to assess licensee views on the clarity of the regulatory framework, and was therefore dependent upon completion of the regulatory framework, which has been delayed to 2020. It will not be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but the expected result and the associated indicator may be reassessed for future use.

** Data was not collected due to a resource focus on completing the elements that comprise the CNSC regulatory framework.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
12,629,803 15,168,878 2,539,075

Note: Shift in regulatory oversight demands.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
83 90 7
Sub-Program 1.5.2: Scientific and Technical Information

This sub-program explains the scientific knowledge basis for the CNSC’s regulatory positions. This sub-program is related to the research sub-program through its use of scientific and technical information generated from outside sources (contracts, contribution agreements and grants) as well as inside sources (CNSC staff research and analysis) to provide a reasonable base to systematically review existing and new scientific information supporting the regulatory decision making by the Commission and its delegated authorities. The assessment of scientific information and the explanation thereof is adapted, customized and translated to stakeholders, including the nuclear technical community (nuclear safety experts and academia), nuclear licensees, vendors, special interest groups, Indigenous groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations (such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency) and the general public.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results
Scientific and technical information supports regulatory decision making Number of papers and conference presentations by CNSC staff TBD* TBD* 41 71 29**

* This indicator will not be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but will be reassessed and a target will be developed for the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Only papers and presentations posted to the external website were recorded.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
8,605,186 3,801,061 (4,804,125)

Note: Shift in regulatory oversight demands.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
50 25 (25)

Note: Shift in regulatory oversight demands.

Sub-Program 1.5.3: Research

This sub-program conducts research to generate objective scientific and technical information to enhance regulatory decisions based on research and the CNSC’s knowledge base, through the administration of contracts, contribution agreements and grants. CNSC staff and management attain direct benefits from this research. Other beneficiaries include the nuclear technical community (nuclear safety experts, academic community, research laboratories), nuclear licensees, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations (such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency) and the public.

This program administers funding from the following transfer payments program: Class Grants and Contributions Program.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Address gaps and uncertainties in the CNSC’s regulatory knowledge base

Percentage of research projects completed that were used in:

  • the regulatory framework (including standards development)
  • Commission hearings
  • Other technical assessments by CNSC staff
TBD* TBD*

28%
(5 projects)

6%
(1 projects)

66%
(12 projects)

26 research projects funded**

33%
(6 projects)

0%
(0 projects)

66%
(12 projects)

* This indicator will no longer be reported on in future Departmental Results Reports, but may be reassessed and a target may be developed for the program’s Performance Information Profile.

** Resource constraints impaired the CNSC’s ability to analyze the use of research projects completed by specialists in 2016–17.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
5,649,772 5,509,707 (140,065)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
13 13 0
Sub-Program 1.5.4: Public Engagement and Outreach

This sub-program develops and implements strategies that identify existing and emerging key stakeholder groups, and then develops tools and tactics to reach these specific stakeholders (including the duty to consult with Aboriginal groups). The information provided is credible, easily understood and tailored to stakeholder information needs. Stakeholders include the Canadian public, Canadian nuclear licensees, vendors, the academic community, special interest groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations and Aboriginal groups in Canada.

This program administers funding from the following transfer payments program: Participant Funding Program.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual  results 2015–16 Actual results
The Canadian public has access to credible and understandable information across multiple media

Percentage of outreach program participants agreeing that the outreach activity positively influenced their understanding of nuclear safety and security, etc.

Measure: % of participants surveyed that agree outreach program positively impacted their understanding of nuclear safety issues (after an outreach event)

Baseline being developed* March 31, 2018 N/A**

Pilot project at the Science Teachers Association of Ontario 2016 conference

Of 120 surveys completed:

  • 60% of respondents had never heard about the CNSC
  • 28% of participants knew about the CNSC’s educational tools, and half of this group had used them in the past
N/A

* This indicator has been reconfigured for reporting on the program through the GC InfoBase (“Awareness in target audiences of the CNSC and its role as Canada’s nuclear regulator”).

** Some surveys were conducted but early results indicated that the data would not be useful.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
1,697,122 2,609,588 912,466

Note: Increase in outreach activities.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
8 10 2

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10service categories are:Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services and Acquisition Services.

Results

Internal Services are leveraged to ensure that the CNSC is a dynamic, flexible and highly skilled organization that is supported by modern management practices and tools, and responds to an evolving workforce and industry. To this end, in 2017–18 the CNSC:

  • Conducted a high-level assessment of the top mitigating measures recommended by the Communications Security Establishment and addressed critical priorities
    • the CNSC is currently working with Shared Services Canada on the Government of Canada Secret Network
  • Enhanced workplace and workforce management practices with the full implementation of the CNSC’s key behavioural competenciesFootnote 17 into human resources functions
  • Figure 4. The CNSC’s key behavioural competencies

  • Initiated a project to improve how the CNSC interacts with licensees for reporting of nuclear materials
  • Implemented the Government of Canada’s Policy on Results, with the development of the CNSC’s Departmental Results Framework, Program Inventory and Performance Information Profiles, which now form the reporting structure for future Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports
  • Made progress in the planning phase of a new financial and material management system, to ensure effective configuration with existing CNSC systems
    • project charter and  memorandum of understanding (MoU) finalized with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, with which the CNSC is collaborating towards full implementation
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
40,870,088 44,090,697 45,450,614 47,109,464 3,018,767

Note: The difference between actual and planned spending is due to several reasons:

  • the increased salary costs due to increased FTE utilization
  • salary increases for 2017–18 and retroactive salary payments covering 2014–15 to 2016–17, as a result of negotiated salary adjustments
  • initial costs incurred for the replacement of the CNSC’s current financial and material management system
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
234 269 35

Note: The difference between actual and planned FTEs is primarily due to the following reasons:

  • replacement of information management and information technology consultants with indeterminate employees
  • the addition of resources to address the replacement of the CNSC’s current financial and material management system
  • the addition of resources to address the challenges arising from implementation of the Phoenix pay system

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 98,133,441 99,186,919 108,169,265 113,483,628 113,628,359 115,678,657
Voted 39,835,227 37,939,111 41,624,040 38,176,811 38,176,811 38,034,147
Total 137,968,668 137,126,030 149,793,305 151,660,439 151,805,170 153,712,804
Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2017–18  Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Actual spending (authorities used)
Nuclear Fuel Cycle 10,096,285 10,891,883 14,487,287 14,267,181 11,227,829 10,847,005 11,570,635 10,173,578
Nuclear Reactors 39,698,384 42,826,661 47,217,482 48,880,322 44,147,591 46,375,052 41,057,571 40,002,299
Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment 13,824,249 14,913,615 12,446,898 12,898,452 19,496,085 13,452,249 13,395,547 13,930,082
Nuclear Non-Proliferation 5,937,337 6,405,206 6,267,181 6,468,632 6,602,765 4,920,301 5,327,246 5,982,791
Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program 26,494,116 28,581,883 25,500,088 26,314,480 29,265,079 27,089,234 24,375,420 26,696,945
Subtotal 96,050,371 103,619,248 105,918,936 108,829,067 110,739,349 102,683,841 95,726,419 96,785,695
Internal Services 40,870,088 44,090,697 45,741,503 42,976,103 45,450,614 47,109,464 41,399,611 41,182,973
Total 136,920,459 147,709,945 151,660,439 151,805,170 156,189,963 149,793,305 137,126,030 137,968,668

In 2017–18, the CNSC transitioned from its Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture, which was required under the previous Policy on Management Resources and Results Structures, to a Departmental Results Framework (DRF), which is required under the new Policy on Results. The planned spending for 2018–19 and 2019–20 was prepared as per the DRF, where the programs were consolidated under the core responsibility of Nuclear Regulation.

The financial resources indicated in the table above include the amounts reported for the CNSC’s Main Estimates as well as the authorities used for the previous three years, as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. The planned spending for 2018–19 and 2019–20 were prepared as per the DRF and restated to the Program Alignment Architecture for illustration purposes only.

The CNSC’s Main Estimates for fiscal year 2017–18 totalled $136.9 million, compared to total authorities of $155.3 million. The $19.3 million increase is primarily attributable to:

  • contributions to employee benefit plans for personnel expenditures related to subsection21(3) of the NSCA that were not included in the 2017–18 Main Estimates
  • funds received from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat for negotiated salary adjustments and for the reimbursement of eligible paylist expenses
  • an operating budget carry-forward from 2016–17 to 2017–18

The increase in actual spending from $137.1 million in 2016–17 to $149.8 million in 2017–18 is primarily due to salary increases for 2017–18 and retroactive salary payments covering 2014–15 to 2016–17, as a result of negotiated salary adjustments. The increase from planned spending of $147.7 million for 2017-18 to actual spending of $149.8 million is a result of higher retroactive salary payments than were initially forecasted.

Planned spending is forecasted to increase to $151.7 million in 2018–19, from actual spending of $149.8 million in 2017–18 due to increased salary and wages and costs relating to the replacement of the CNSC’s current financial and material management system, partially offset by retroactive salary payments that were made in 2017–18. Planned spending is projected to increase marginally to $151.8 million in 2019–20, from $151.7 million in 2018–19 due to cost-of-living increases that are offset by costs to be incurred in 2018–19 for the replacement of the CNSC’s current financial and material management system.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full‑time equivalents)
Programs and  Internal Services 2015–16 Actual full-time equivalents 2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents
Nuclear Fuel Cycle 64 71 68 62 92 87
Nuclear Reactors 257 261 273 278 298 298
Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment 83 85 88 78 84 84
Nuclear Non-Proliferation 38 31 40 29 35 35
Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program 145 128 154 138 130 130
Subtotal 587 576 623 585 639 634
Internal Services 221 247 234 269 295 295
Total 808 823 857 854 934 929

The increase in FTEs over the last three years is primarily attributable to the implementation of the workforce renewal initiative (temporary undertaking). In recognition of its aging and retiring workforce and projected labour market pressures, the CNSC has implemented programs to protect its core organizational capabilities critical to its mandate. Workforce initiatives include significant new-graduate hiring and continuation of technical co-operative programs as well as the implementation of a knowledge management strategy and continued workforce planning efforts.

The growth within the Internal Services Program is a result of the replacement of the CNSC’s current financial and material management system, challenges arising from the implementation of the Phoenix pay system and the replacement of information management and information technology consultants with indeterminate employees.

The increase from 854 actual FTEs in 2017–18 to 934 planned FTEs in 2018–19 is due to anticipated growth in regulatory oversight activities as well as the continued implementation of the workforce renewal initiative, which focuses on the recruitment and development of new graduates to meet the organization’s future need for senior regulatory and technical officers. 

Expenditures by vote

For information on the CNSC’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018.Footnote 18

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the CNSC’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GCInfoBase.vii

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The CNSC’s financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the departmental website.Footnote 19

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 Planned results 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2017–18 Planned results) Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2016–17 Actual results)
Total expenses 162,414,000 163,143,631 152,999,737 729,631 10,143,894
Total revenues 115,199,000 113,322,728 108,064,648 (1,876,272) 5,258,080
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 47,215,000 49,820,903 44,935,089 2,605,903 4,885,814

The actual total revenues of $113.3 million were 1.6% or $1.9 million lower than planned revenues of $115.2 million, as a result of lower-than-forecasted revenues collected for special projects due to delays in vendor design reviews and lower license cost recovery fees arising from lower than planned expenses. The actual total expenses of $163.1 million were 0.4% or $0.7million more than planned expenses of $162.4 million.

The CNSC’s total expenses increased by 6.6% or $10.1 million, while revenues increased by 4.9% or $5.3 million from 2016–17 to 2017–18. The increase in expenses was primarily due to an increase in salaries and employee benefits as a result of increases in salaries and the number of full-time equivalents. It is also attributable to an increase in amortization expenses as a result of developing and purchasing informatics software and implementing leasehold improvements. The increase in revenue was attributable to increases in regulatory oversight activity as well as higher formula fees for nuclear substances used for commercial and industrial purposes as the CNSC continues to phase in increases to fully recover the cost for these activities. The increase in revenues also reflects increased special projects related to vendor design reviews.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position as of March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 2016–17 Difference (2017–18 minus 2016–17)
Total net liabilities 42,516,893 49,499,602 (6,982,709)
Total net financial assets 27,464,509 35,596,162 (8,131,653)
Departmental net debt 15,052,384 13,903,440 1,148,944
Total non‑financial assets 13,613,468 13,720,141 (106,673)
Departmental net financial position (1,438,916) (183,299) (1,255,617)

The decrease in the CNSC’s net liabilities is mainly due to a decrease in the amounts payable to licensees due to the excess of fees charged and collected over the actual fees earned at year-end and a decrease in the liability for projected collective agreements retroactive payments, which were largely paid in 2017–18.

The decrease in the CNSC’s net financial assets is primarily a result of a decrease in the amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund, which is related to the decrease in accounts payable at year end.

The overall difference between the Total net liabilities and Total net financial assets are then reflected in the Departmental net debt.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: Amarjeet Sohi

Institutional head: Rumina Velshi

Ministerial portfolio: Natural Resources CanadaFootnote 20

Enabling instrument: Nuclear Safety and Control ActFootnote 21

Year of incorporation/commencement: 2000

Other: The CNSC’s headquarters are located in Ottawa, Ontario. The CNSC maintains 11 regional offices, both at major facilities and elsewhere, in order to conduct inspections of licensees across the country on a regular basis.

Reporting framework

The CNSC’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017–18 are shown below.

1. Strategic Outcome: Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canada’s nuclear regulatory regime.

  • 1.1 Program: Nuclear Fuel Cycle
    • 1.1.1 Sub‑Program: Uranium Mines and Mills
    • 1.1.2 Sub‑Program: Nuclear Processing Facilities
    • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Nuclear Waste Management Facilities
  • 1.2 Program: Nuclear Reactors
    • 1.2.1 Sub‑Program: Nuclear Power Plants
    • 1.2.2 Sub‑Program: Research Reactors
  • 1.3 Program: Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment
    • 1.3.1 Sub‑Program: Medical Sector
    • 1.3.2 Sub‑Program: Industrial Sector
    • 1.3.3 Sub-Program: Commercial Sector
    • 1.3.4 Sub-Program: Academic and Research Sector
    • 1.3.5 Sub-Program: Packaging and Transport
    • 1.3.6 Sub-Program: Dosimetry Services
  • 1.4 Program: Nuclear Non-Proliferation
    • 1.4.1 Sub‑Program: Domestic and International Arrangements
    • 1.4.2 Sub‑Program: Safeguards
    • 1.4.3 Sub-Program: Import and Export
  • 1.5 Program: Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information
    • 1.5.1 Sub‑Program: Regulatory Framework
    • 1.5.2 Sub‑Program: Scientific and Technical Information
    • 1.5.3 Sub-Program: Research
    • 1.5.4 Sub-Program: Public Engagement and Outreach

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower‑level programs is available on the GCInfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CNSC’s website:Footnote 22

  • Evaluations
  • Fees
  • Internal audits
  • Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote 23 This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Head office
280 Slater Street
P.O. Box 1046, Station B
Ottawa Ontario K1P 5S9
Canada

Telephone: 613-995-5894
Toll free: 1-800-668-5284
Fax: 613-995-5086

E-mail: cnsc.info.ccsn@canada.ca
Website: nuclearsafety.gc.caFootnote 24

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
ProgramAlignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislationsets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long‑term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Nuclear Safety and Control Act

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Financial Administration Act

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

International Atomic Energy Agency, “Code of Conduct

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Canada Border Services Agency, “Single Window Initiative

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “Research report summaries 2017–2018

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “REGDOC-2.12.3, Security of Nuclear Substances: Sealed Sources

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

GC InfoBase

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “REGDOC-2.11.1, Volume II: Assessing the Long-Term Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “Emergency preparedness and the CNSC – Exercise Unified Control

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “Pre-Project Design Review of Terrestrial Energy Inc. Integral Molten Salt Reactor-400

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “Pre-Licensing Vendor Design Review

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Canada Border Services Agency, “Single Window Initiative

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “REGDOC-2.13.1, Safeguards and Nuclear Material Accountancy

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “REGDOC-2.9.1, Environmental Protection: Environmental Principles, Assessments and Protection Measures, version 1.1

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Footnote 15

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “REGDOC-2.2.4, Fitness for Duty: Volume II : Managing Alcohol and Drug Use, version 2

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Footnote 16

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “The CNSC’s Regulatory Framework Plan

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Footnote 17

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “CNSC key behavioural competencies

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Footnote 18

Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018

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Footnote 19

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, “Annual reports

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Footnote 20

Natural Resources Canada

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Footnote 21

Nuclear Safety and Control Act

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Footnote 22

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

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Footnote 23

Report on Federal Tax Expenditures

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Footnote 24

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

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