Departmental Performance Report 2013-14

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013-14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization's website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

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President's Message

This picture portrays the President of the CNSC Michael Binder.

It is once again my honour and great pleasure to present the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Departmental Performance Report for 2013-14. In the past year, the CNSC continued its commitment to nuclear safety by strengthening its regulatory framework, assessing applications and granting licenses, conducting inspections, and enforcing regulations. Through this work, the CNSC continues to build on its strategic outcome of safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes, and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness.

We have continued to implement the CNSC's Fukushima Task Force Report - an integrated action plan, developed with valued input from public consultations, two independent reviews, and a special external advisory committee. This integrated plan includes actions, deliverables and timelines to further improve nuclear safety. The CNSC has completed all of the plan's short-term actions and will have completed all of the mid- and long-term actions by 2015.

The Commission held several public proceedings this past year and heard from many Canadians who wished to express their views on nuclear safety. The licensing hearings covered a full range of nuclear facilities, including uranium mines, nuclear power plants, nuclear processing facilities and nuclear research reactors. The CNSC continued to reach out to Canadians through many activities. In addition to Ottawa, Commission public proceedings were held in Saskatoon and La Ronge, Saskatchewan, and in Clarington and Toronto, Ontario. Participant funding was offered to enhance participation in Commission hearings for major nuclear facilities.

During the year, the CNSC continued to build on its suite of outreach tools by releasing a number of informative videos on its website, expanding its dissemination of technical, scientific and regulatory information through the use of social media channels on Facebook and YouTube, and maximizing cross-promotion opportunities with new content being developed and shared across all platforms. CNSC 101 presentations (an outreach program that travels to select locations in Canada) were offered in 16 different locations to over 500 participants.

Staff provided extensive regulatory support to the five-week-long Joint Review Panel for Ontario Power Generation's proposed Deep Geologic Repository in Kincardine, Ontario. Additional hearings were held in early September 2014. Once the panel is satisfied that it has obtained all the necessary information, the Panel will prepare an environmental assessment report and submit it to the Minister of the Environment, who will then make the decision if the project can proceed.

The CNSC continues to adjust its resources and ready itself to respond to uncertainties in the nuclear industry. The Government of Ontario's decision to defer construction of new power reactors at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station and Hydro-Québec's transition of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station from commercial operation to safe storage are recent examples of important changes that require the CNSC to be adaptable in its long-term planning.

Our work, both domestically and internationally, is always focused on our primary commitment to Canadians: that we will never compromise safety.

____________________________
Michael Binder
President

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Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: Minister of Natural Resources
Institutional Head: Michael Binder, President
Ministerial Portfolio: Natural Resources Canada
Enabling Instrument(s): Nuclear Safety and Control Act
Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2000

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) was established on May 31, 2000, with the coming into effect of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA). It replaced the Atomic Energy Control Board, established in 1946 by the Atomic Energy Control Act. The CNSC is a departmental corporation listed in Schedule II of the Financial Administration ActFootnote i, and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources.

Responsibilities

The CNSC is an independent and science-based regulatory agency and quasi-judicial administrative tribunal, and provides regulatory oversight of all nuclear-related activities and substances in Canada.

To protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians, and the environment, the CNSC conducts environmental assessments (EAs) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012Footnote ii (CEAA 2012) and/or the NSCA. An EA under the NSCA is a component of the CNSC licensing process and is carried out as part of the CNSC's review of all licence applications. No decision is rendered on the EA itself, as the information is intended to support the regulatory decision being sought under the NSCA.

In addition to regulatory requirements under the NSCA for environmental protection, the Commission must also meet the requirements of the CEAA 2012 for projects designated under that Act. In accordance with the CEAA 2012, the CNSC is the sole federal responsible authority for conducting EAs for designated projects regulated under the NSCA and described in the Regulations Designating Physical Activities. Before considering a regulatory decision under the NSCA, the Commission must decide if the proposed project is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects. The CNSC is also responsible for designating installations under the Nuclear Liability Act.Footnote iii

The CNSC is Canada's authority for the implementation of nuclear safeguards, as set out in the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.Footnote iv The CNSC also administers the nuclear non-proliferation provisions of bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements between the Government of Canada and foreign nuclear trading partners.

The Commission has up to seven permanent members, appointed by the Governor in Council, and is supported by CNSC employees across Canada. The president of the CNSC is a full-time Commission member, while other members may be appointed to serve on a full- or part-time basis. Temporary members can also be appointed by the Governor-in-Council, as required. Commission members are chosen according to their credentials, and are independent of any government, industry or special interest group.

The Commission is an administrative tribunal set up at arm's length from government. The Commission makes its decisions in a public forum, guided by clear rules of procedure. Interested parties and members of the public may be heard at proceedings that are webcast live and periodically held in communities close to major nuclear facilities, in order to make them as accessible as possible to affected persons.
The Commission provides extensive reasons for its decisions, which are based on information that may include public input, as well as the recommendations of expert CNSC staff. Decisions, hearing transcripts, webcast archives and CNSC Online resource modules are publicly available on the CNSC website, Facebook and YouTube.

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Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

The following illustrates the CNSC's strategic outcome, as well as the complete framework of programs and sub-programs that support the strategic outcome.

Strategic Outcome: Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness.

  • 1.1 Program: Regulatory framework program
    • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Administration of the NSCA
    • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Domestic and international arrangements
    • 1.1.3 Sub-program: Regulatory research
    • 1.1.4 Sub-program: Stakeholder engagement
  • 1.2 Program: Licensing and certification program
    • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Application assessment
    • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Licensing and certification decisions
  • 1.3 Program: Compliance program
    • 1.3.1 Sub-program: Verification
    • 1.3.2 Sub-program: Enforcement
  • 1.4 Program: Internal services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Program(s)
1. Ensure, above all else, the safe use of nuclear energy and nuclear substances in Canada Ongoing
  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
Summary of Progress

Not only is this the number one priority of the CNSC, but it also forms the bulk of the CNSC's work program. In 2013-14, the Commission issued 12 decisions related to nuclear power plants, five related to uranium mines and mills, two related to processing and research facilities, and one decision to revoke an order issued earlier in the fiscal year.

In 2013-14, the CNSC also carried out nearly 2,000 on-site inspections and 4,700 desktop reviews ensuring Canada's nuclear facilities and its licensees, as well as nuclear-related activities, are among the safest and most secure in the world. As the result of these verification activities, 18 orders were issued to specific licensees using nuclear substances. These orders typically required the licensee to cease using a nuclear-related device until it had complied with CNSC requirements. Three administrative monetary penalties (AMPs) were issued in 2013-14 for violations of regulatory requirements handling portable nuclear gauges in different situations. These were the first AMPs issued under the new Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations, which came into force in July 2013.

In accordance with requirements defined in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations, 492 export licences and 157 import licences were issued for nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information. An additional 212 export licences were issued for risk-significant radioactive sources, in accordance with the General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations. The CNSC also issued 163 transport licences, revised 66 transport licences, and issued 19 transport certificates for package design and for special form radioactive material. Furthermore, 31 new certificates were issued and 65 revised for radiation services and other prescribed equipment.

Additional details on CNSC's overall performance can be found in Section II of this report.

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Priority Type Program(s)
2. Continue the implementation of the CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force RecommendationsFootnote v Previously committed to
  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
Summary of Progress

The CNSC Integrated Action Plan on the Lessons Learned From the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear AccidentFootnote vi exists to further strengthen the safety of Canadian nuclear power plants and other major nuclear facilities and to enhance communication and public education. Its implementation includes recommendations to the CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations from public consultations, two independent reviews and a special external advisory committee. The Action Plan achieved significant progress in 2013-14 and reflects all of the actions, deliverables and timelines established to further improve nuclear safety through: strengthened defence in depth; enhanced emergency preparedness; an improved regulatory framework and processes; and enhanced international collaboration, communication and public education. In total, the plan lists 36 distinct action items for nuclear power plants (NPPs), non-NPPs and the CNSC. Completion of all action items is on track for 2015. CNSC staff have confirmed that:

  • All short-term actions are closed.
  • All medium-term Fukushima actions are closed, with the exception of a few related to probabilistic safety assessment for external hazard assessment, pending completion of review by CNSC staff.
  • Implementation of long-term actions is underway and on schedule.

This was reported to the Commission on August 21, 2014.

Verification of licensees' progress on action items such as safety design upgrades, analysis and procedures are integrated into normal CNSC compliance processes. CNSC staff also developed a comprehensive communications and education strategy to enhance the organization's ability to respond in the unlikely event of a nuclear accident in Canada. The strategy includes the creation of a pre-populated, non-visible external website that can be activated only in the event of a major nuclear accident. The CNSC collaborates with federal and provincial emergency management organizations to enhance communications during an emergency and to clarify roles and responsibilities of stakeholder organizations such as Emergency Management Ontario, Health Canada and Public Safety Canada.

Priority Type Program(s)
3. Provide regulatory support to the Joint Review Panel (JRP) for the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) Previously committed to Licensing and certification
Summary of Progress

In 2013-14, CNSC staff provided extensive regulatory support to the JRP for OPG's DGR. The DGR is a facility for the long-term management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste from OPG owned or operated nuclear power reactors located in Ontario. Low-level waste consists of items such as clothes, mops and paper that have become contaminated with low levels of radioactivity during routine clean-up and maintenance activities at nuclear generating stations. Intermediate-level radioactive waste consists primarily of used nuclear reactor components, ion-exchange resins, and filters used to purify reactor systems.

The JRP held a hearing between September 16 and October 11, 2013 (Phase I) in which 160 intervenors participated. In addition, the JRP held a focused hearing on licensing issues from October 28-30, 2013 (Phase II), in which 160 intervenors also participated.

During the public hearings, the panel heard 22 presentations from OPG, 19 from the CNSC, 17 from federal and provincial departments and ministries, six from local municipalities, seven from First Nations and Metis groups, as well as 121 oral interventions and statements from members of the public and other organizations and bodies. Additionally, 73 written interventions were read into the record; 71 undertakings were responded to by the proponent, regulator, other authorities and the public; and there were numerous questions from the panel and those in attendance. Over the course of the past year, CNSC staff were actively engaged in the review of OPG's environmental impact statement, as well as technical documentation and interventions, and provided technical and research assistance to the panel members. Additionally, CNSC staff also appeared before the JRP to make presentations and respond to a broad range of questions.

Following the last hearing, the JRP issued a detailed request to OPG for additional information. The JRP has announced additional hearing dates for September 2014 and is expected to submit its report in 2015. CNSC staff will continue to provide technical and research support, and participate in future hearings.

The CNSC, through its research and support program, is developing independent knowledge on several issues where the need for further understanding was identified during the hearings.

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Priority Type Program(s)
4. Sustain CNSC efforts to implement the Government of Canada's regulatory reform initiative - Responsible Resource Development (RRD), Red Tape Reduction Action Plan, the Major Projects Management Office (MPMO), and the Northern Projects Management Office Ongoing Regulatory framework
Summary of Progress

In 2013-14, the CNSC continued to work with other government departments to coordinate the regulatory review processes of major projects and implement the Government of Canada's regulatory reform initiatives.

As part of the Government of Canada's RRD initiative, the CNSC and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), in December 2013, supporting the Government of Canada's regulatory reform objectives through the coordination of activities related to the review and decisions made under section 35 of the Fisheries Act for Class I nuclear facilities and uranium mines and mills. Along with DFO, the CNSC has developed a work plan for implementing the MOU, which includes developing compliance protocols and tools for reporting and monitoring, a communications plan, and knowledge transfer and sharing.

In support of the RRD initiative and following changes made in 2012 to the NSCA, which called for the CNSC to develop and implement AMPs, the CNSC Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations came into force on July 3, 2013. To complement this new regulation, the CNSC published the regulatory document Compliance and Enforcement: Administrative Monetary Penalties. The document provides an overview of how and where AMPs fit into the CNSC's approach to graduated enforcement, and describes how penalty amounts are administered.

In implementing the CEAA 2012 and regarding significant northern projects, the Minister of the Environment made a decision in 2013-14 to continue the EA for the Millennium uranium mineFootnote 1 and the former Gunnar mine site rehabilitation projects under the CEAA. The CNSC also continued to work with Natural Resources Canada's MPMOFootnote vii and other implicated federal departments to sign a project agreement for the proposed Kiggavik uranium mining and milling operation in Kivalliq, Nunavut.

To meet commitments in the RRD, CNSC's Annual Compliance Reporting was made available online to select licensees. In addition, service standards were developed and published for high-volume authorizations for nuclear substance licences and for import and export licences. Previously existing service standards for exposure device operators were also published. The CNSC's Forward Regulatory Plan was made available online.

The CNSC continued to strengthen its implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management by exploring new ways to improve early engagement with stakeholders in developing CNSC's regulatory approaches, such as through workshops and the development of discussion papers.

Priority Type Program(s)
5. Prepare for the regulatory oversight of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) refurbishment and continued operation Previously committed to Licensing and certification
Summary of Progress

As part of Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's life extension and continued operations, OPG (as licensee and owner) has requested the renewal of its operating licence, which is set to expire on December 31, 2015. The CNSC has scheduled a public hearing for the second half of 2015 to address this request. The licence renewal process requires the CNSC to review the licensee's past performance, proposed safety improvements, and set of documentation that governs the safe operation of the plant before making a recommendation to the Commission to grant a licence and establish the conditions for DNGS operations.

Within the next operating cycle, and starting in 2016, OPG anticipates to sequentially refurbish each one of its four nuclear reactors at Darlington to today's standards, and to extend its production of electricity by roughly another 30 years. This refurbishment project preparation is underway, and the project implementation for replacements and improvements to the plant would take place over the next few years. The licence renewal process applies to both the nuclear generating station's operation and refurbishment projects, which are conditional upon the Commission's decision.

The EA for the DNGS proposed refurbishment is the subject of a judicial review currently under consideration by the Federal Court.

While progress remains on schedule, continued prioritization and resources must be given to this project without compromising the integrity of the compliance program for current operations at Darlington.

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Priority Type Program(s)
6. Prepare to review the upcoming application for a licence to construct new power reactor units at Darlington Previously committed to Licensing and certification
Summary of Progress

Throughout 2013-14, the CNSC carried out its plans for meeting this priority.

A number of CNSC regulatory documents applicable to new builds were approved by the Commission such as the Design of New Nuclear Power Plants. These documents further clarify CNSC requirements, including the incorporation of key Fukushima lessons learned.

Three vendor-design reviews for nuclear power plant technologies were completed: the CANDU Energy EC-6 (Phase 3 review); the Westinghouse AP-1000 (Phase 2 review); and the Areva/Mitsubishi ATMEA 1 (Phase 1 review). As the recipients of the CNSC's review comments, these vendors have the ability to share findings with prospective utilities, such as OPG, who may use such information to inform their own licence application work. Executive summaries of these reviews are posted on CNSC's external website.

EA activities for the Darlington New Nuclear Plant also continued. The CNSC provided technical expertise on next steps for the Round Whitefish Action Plan and reviewed OPG's 2013 Bank Swallow Program results and aquatic related studies.

In December 2013, the Government of Ontario released its long-term energy plan. The plan indicated that building new nuclear capacity at Darlington would be deferred indefinitely, thereby postponing the CNSC's review of OPG's upcoming application for a licence to construct new power reactor units at Darlington. However, the provincial government also indicated that it intended to work with OPG to maintain the power reactor site licence issued in August 2012.

The JRP EA findings and the decision to issue a licence to prepare the site were legally challenged by several environmental groups; and in May 2014, the Federal Court ruled that three specific points in the assessment should be returned to the panel for further consideration and that the licence be withdrawn. The matter is currently under appeal.

Priority Type Program(s)
7. Provide regulatory oversight of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station end-of-life and transition from commercial operation to safe storage New Compliance
Summary of Progress

Hydro-Québec ended commercial operation of its Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station as of December 28, 2012. In January 2013, a liaison committee was established between the CNSC and Hydro-Québec to confirm how requirements apply in the transition to the safe-storage state, and to confirm that technical reviews and compliance activities are on track for completion. The CNSC completed a technical review of the second revision to Hydro-Quebec's Gentilly-2 plan for the end of commercial operations and transition to safe storage, and highlighted some outstanding issues for Hydro Québec to address and for which the CNSC will track progress. A technical working group composed of CNSC and Hydro-Québec specialist staff continued to meet in 2013-14 regarding a Gentilly-2 power-reactor operating-licence amendment request. The requested administrative amendments were approved and the licence was amended in July 2014 to remove licence conditions that no longer applied and modify other licence conditions to reflect the decreased risk presented by the current state of the station.

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Priority Type Program(s)
8. Prepare for the uranium mine renewal hearings New
  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
Summary of Progress

In 2013-14, two Commission hearings were held to deal with the renewal of licences for four (out of the five) operating uranium mines, all located in Saskatchewan. The Beaverlodge decommissioned mine/mill site and Key Lake, McArthur River and Rabbit Lake operating uranium mines were all granted 10-year licences. In addition, Cigar Lake uranium mine was granted its first operating licence, for eight years. This was the top priority for licensing and compliance work in the regulation of uranium mines and mills.

Priority Type Program(s)
9. Conduct a strategic planning exercise to further ready the CNSC to respond to uncertainties in the nuclear industry New Internal Services
Summary of Progress

Notwithstanding new developments in the Canadian nuclear industry-such as a deep geological repository for the long-term management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, potential uranium mining developments, interests in Small Modular Reactors, and the Québec government's October 2012 announcement to transition the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station from commercial operation to safe storage-the current economic climate has yielded uncertainties about if or when certain projects may go ahead. Therefore, the CNSC continued to monitor the direction and plans of the nuclear industry, and strategize on the best path forward for regulating during this uncertainty, while not compromising nuclear safety.

In 2013-14, the CNSC launched a strategic planning exercise focused on the development of a strategic planning framework and strategic workforce plan to guide the organization over the long term. The framework and workforce plan are well underway and will be in place for 2014-15.

An integral piece of the strategic planning effort has been the work to develop the CNSC's first Enterprise Risk Management Policy and Risk Profile, on track to be completed in 2014-15. The implementation of the policy will guide the CNSC in monitoring and addressing organizational and operational risks.

Priority Type Program(s)
10. Continue the dissemination of objective and scientific information New Regulatory Framework
Summary of Progress

The dissemination of scientific, technical and regulatory information concerning the activities of the CNSC is a key part of its mandate and a legislated activity under the NSCA.

In February 2014, the CNSC launched an improved, simplified website, based on the main activities it regulates. The CNSC also released a host of informative videos about nuclear safety topics, and featured them on the website and the CNSC's YouTube channel. The CNSC also continued to expand its reach through the use of its social media channels on Facebook and YouTube, maximizing cross-promotion opportunities so that new content developed is shared across all platforms. The CNSC's research also contributed to the significant efforts made by CNSC staff to further the understanding of regulatory science: CNSC staff prepared 25 technical papers and four peer-reviewed journal articles over the last year.

Licensees are required to maintain an ongoing dialogue with stakeholders about their licensed activities and the risks associated with them. Throughout 2013-14, CNSC staff monitored the implementation of licensee public information and disclosure programs, as outlined in the regulatory document entitled Public Information and Disclosure.

The CNSC continued to administer its Participant Funding Program, which was established in 2011 to enhance the participation of the public, Aboriginal peoples and other stakeholders in Commission hearings for major nuclear facilities. This year, $282,878 in funding was awarded to 20 recipients to participate in Commission hearings on OPG's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station licence renewal, Cameco's Cigar Lake mine licence renewal, Cameco's Beaverlodge decommissioned mine/mill site licence renewal, and Cameco's licence renewal applications for the Key Lake uranium mill, Rabbit Lake uranium mine and mill, and McArthur River uranium mine.

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Risk Analysis

In 2013-14, the CNSC embarked on a formal risk-profiling process. Branch and enterprise risk profiles will better inform future risk reporting in the 2015-16 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Developments in the nuclear industry and reduced industry projections, including delays in announcements of new NPPs in Canada (e.g.: Darlington), the transition from commercial operation to safe storage at Hydro-Québec's Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station and more recently, Strateco Resources's suspension of its Matoush project in Northern Quebec and Cameco Corporation's Millennium project in Northern Saskatchewan Such environmental forces, along with anticipated attrition of CNSC's workforce and changing labour force availability, have combined to make strategic workforce planning an imperative. To that end, CNSC is currently developing a strategic workforce plan to ensure that the organization has the workforce it needs to respond to future challenges.
  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
  • Internal services
Unforeseen demands, which can draw on CNSC's resources

CNSC launched the Workforce of the Future Initiative to anticipate the workforce requirements of the coming years and to define and implement concrete actions that ensure CNSC's continued capacity to effectively deliver on its mandate.

In Budget 2013, the CNSC received statutory authority-pursuant to subsection 21(3) of the NSCA-to spend during a fiscal year any revenues that it receives in the current or previous fiscal year through the conduct of its operations. This authority to spend revenues provides a sustainable and timely funding regime to address changes in the regulatory oversight workload associated with the Canadian nuclear industry.

  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
  • Internal services
Efficient operations

In response to changing industry activity, the CNSC has engaged in scenario-planning in order to ensure that it can continue to operate effectively, while providing regulatory oversight of Canada's nuclear industry. Coinciding with these scenario plans, the CNSC has launched a strategic planning exercise, including the development of a CNSC enterprise risk profile.

The CNSC is also reducing financial risks by expanding its financial guarantees program to other nuclear industry areas, including industrial and radiography uses, medical and laboratory facilities and for nuclear substances. The goal of the program is to ensure licensees take the necessary actions to ensure funding is available for the conduct of safe termination of their activities should they be in that position. This program is expected to be in place in 2014-15.

  • Regulatory framework
  • Licensing and certification
  • Compliance
  • Internal services

Actual Expenditures

Table 1 below provides a summary of total planned and actual CNSC spending for 2013-14.

Table 1: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
132,901,485 139,139,248 151,454,605 145,617,021 6,477,773

*Note: Total budgetary expenditures as shown in the 2013-14 Main Estimates and planned spending exclude contributions to employee benefit plans for staff related to expenditures pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA. The 2013-14 actual spending of $145,617,021 is comprised of $46,130,800 in voted appropriation, $15,830,839 in contributions to employee benefit plans and $83,655,382 for expenditures pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA.

The financial resources table above provides a summary of total planned spending, total authorities and actual spending for the CNSC in fiscal year 2013-14. The increase from Main Estimates to planned spending and from planned spending to actual spending is mainly explained by contributions to employee benefit plans for staff related to expenditures pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA and to the cash out of accrued severance in 2013-14. It is partially offset by a reduction in expenditures related to Hydro-Québec's announcement to shut down the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station.

Table 2 below provides a summary of total planned and actual human resources for the CNSC in fiscal year 2013-14.

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Table 2: Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
824 816 (8)

Table 3 below provides a summary of both planned spending and actual spending per program for three fiscal years.

Table 3: Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2013-14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012-13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2011-12
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Strategic Outcome 1:
Regulatory Framework Program 25,193,526 26,637,951 28,420,217 28,653,485 27,580,212 27,536,138 29,682,743 23,243,106
Licensing and Certification Program 28,505,451 29,654,313 28,996,918 31,739,012 25,737,960 24,072,978 25,304,007 33,211,190
Compliance Program 36,550,986 38,922,806 42,979,637 43,501,734 52,018,971 48,652,198 41,778,894 38,302,145
Subtotal 90,249,963 95,215,070 100,396,772 103,894,231 105,337,143 100,261,314 96,765,644 94,756,441
Internal Services Subtotal 42,651,522 43,924,178 41,588,153 41,764,493 46,117,462 45,355,707 42,933,510 41,312,723
Total 132,901,485 139,139,248 141,984,925 145,658,724 151,454,605 145,617,021 139,699,154 136,069,164

The resource levels indicated in the performance summary table above include the amounts reported for the CNSC's Main Estimates as well as the authorities available for use and authorities used for the previous three years, as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. Resource levels for planned spending include the most recent plans, as presented in the 2013-14 and 2014-15RPPs.

The CNSC's Main Estimates for fiscal year 2013-14 totalled $132.9 million, compared to total authorities of $151.4 million. The $18.5 million increase is mainly explained by:

  • contributions to employee benefit plans for staff related to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA that were not included in the 2013-14 Main Estimates or planned spending;
  • spending related to severance cash-out; and
  • the government-wide Single Window Initiative, announced in Budget 2013, to streamline government import regulations and border processes for commercial trade.

This overall increase is partially offset by the reduction in expenditures, phased in over 2013-14 and 2014-15, related to Hydro-Québec's announcement to shut down the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station.

The change in planned spending between 2013-14 and 2015-16 is mainly due to a projected increase in fee revenues due to cost increases related to salaries and wages and a phased-in review of formulas used within the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's Cost Recovery Fees Regulations (2003)Footnote viii. In addition, the appropriation level is increasing because of collective agreement funding and completion of the repayment of loans to Treasury Board Secretariat Management Reserve for investments made in the CNSC's IT and facilities infrastructure.

The CNSC's actual spending increased from $136.1 million in 2011-12 to $139.7 million in 2012-13 due to amounts payable in accordance with the ratification of a new collective agreement, including two years of retroactive payments. In 2013-14, the CNSC's actual spending increased to $145.6 million due to spending related to severance cash-out.

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Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Table 4 below illustrates how CNSC's programs align to the Government of Canada social affairs outcome area.

Table 4: Alignment of 2013-14 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government FrameworkFootnote ix (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes, and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness Regulatory Framework A safe and secure Canada Social affairs 27,536,138
Licensing and Certification 24,072,978
Compliance 48,652,198

Table 5 below illustrates the Government of Canada Outcome area to which CNSC's programs contribute.

Table 5: Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic affairs n/a n/a
Social affairs 95,215,070 100,261,314
International affairs n/a n/a
Government affairs n/a n/a

Departmental Spending Trend

The CNSC's total spending has increased as a result of the collective agreement settlements in 2012-13 and 2013-14. The 2012-13 fiscal year was mainly affected by the retroactive payment of economic increase for 2011-12, as well as an increase in salaries for 2012-13, based on the rates negotiated in the agreement. In 2013-14, a significant amount of severance for voluntary departures was cashed-out, in addition to the last economic increase negotiated in the agreement. This was partially offset by a reduction in expenditures related to Hydro-Québec's announcement to shut down the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station.

The planned spending for 2014-15 shows a decline, due primarily to a planned reduction in FTEs and associated spending, as a result of Hydro-Québec's shutdown of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station.

Planned spending is forecasted to increase in 2015-16 and 2016-17, due to forecasted economic increases for salary costs, in addition to an increase in formula fee revenues to align costs with regulatory activities for the various licence types, as per the CNSC's Cost Recovery Fees Regulations.

The CNSC does not have any sunset programs at this time.

Figure 1: Departmental Spending Trend, fiscal years 2011-12 to 2016-17

Data for Figure 1
Departmental Spending Trend Graph
Fiscal year Voted Spending Sunset Programs
2011-2012 136,069,164 0
2012-2013 139,699,154 0
2013-2014 145,617,021 0
2014-2015 141,984,925 0
2015-2016 145,658,724 0
2016-2017 148,207,316 0

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CNSC's organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.Footnote x

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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The CNSC has one strategic outcome: safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness. To support this outcome, the CNSC has four programs: regulatory framework, licensing and certification, compliance and internal services.

Program: Regulatory Framework

The regulatory framework program is in place to ensure that Canada has a clear and pragmatic regulatory framework for the nuclear industry in Canada.

Funds are used to develop and make improvements to elements of the regulatory framework that protect the health, safety, security and environment for Canadians, while implementing Canada's international commitments on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

The CNSC's regulatory framework includes elements such as:

  • the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and regulations under the Act;
  • regulatory documents, which outline requirements and guidance;
  • nuclear standards developed by the Canadian Standards Association;
  • safeguards agreement and additional protocol between Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); and
  • Canada's bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements and supporting administrative arrangements.

The CNSC also designates installations under the Nuclear Liability Act and, as the sole responsible authority for nuclear projects under the CEAA, carries out EAs for nuclear projects in accordance with both the NSCA and the CEAA.

Table 6 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the regulatory framework program for the next three fiscal years.

Table 6: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
25,193,526 26,637,951 27,580,212 27,536,138 898,187

Table 7 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the regulatory framework program for 2013-14.

Table 7: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
146 144 (2)

Table 8 below aligns the regulatory framework program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 8: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A clear and pragmatic regulatory framework Rate of Court upholding the Commission's decisions 100 percent success rate of Court upholding the Commission's decisions Three cases of judicial review decisions pending*

*The Federal Court of Appeal allowed judicial review applications dealing with OPG's Darlington new build project, in a decision dated May 14, 2014. The CNSC and others have appealed to the Federal Court of Appeal, so the matter remains before the Court. Another case before the Federal Court dealing with a challenge to an EA decision by the CNSC is still pending. The matter was heard but no decision has yet been rendered.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC continued its modernization of the CNSC's regulatory framework according to the priorities outlined in the Regulatory Framework Plan,Footnote xi including publishing regulatory document CNSC Compliance and Enforcement: Administrative Monetary Penalties in March 2014 to complement the CNSC Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations, which came into force in July 2013.

As part of the implementation of the new CNSC Integrated Action Plan on the Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident (refer to organizational priority 2 in Section I), two regulatory documents were published on September 2013: Accident Management: Severe Accident Management Programs for Nuclear Reactors, and Environmental Protection: Policies, Programs and Procedures. The Commission also approved the following regulatory documents:

  • Deterministic Safety Analysis
  • Probabilistic Safety Assessment for Nuclear Power Plants
  • Design of Reactor Facilities: Nuclear Power Plants

Additionally, a new regulatory document entitled Aging Management was published in March 2014, replacing the previously published (June 2011) Aging Management for Nuclear Power Plants regulatory document.

The expected result for this program was met; however, there were three cases awaiting resolution in the courts that may impact this outcome.

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Sub-program: Administration of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act

This sub-program aims to develop necessary changes to the NSCA and its regulations based on the CNSC's ongoing assessment of any gaps in the legislation or regulations, and to recommend these changes to the Government of Canada. The program makes recommendations to the CNSC's Commission Tribunal for new or amended regulations or regulatory documents that are required to support the regulatory framework and provide clarity for licensees.

Table 9 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the administration of the NSCA sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 9: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
6,907,221 7,140,121 232,900

Table 10 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the administration of the NSCA sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 10: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
38 37 (1)

Table 11 below aligns the administration of the NSCA sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 11: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
An NSCA without gaps that establishes a clear mandate, governance, authorities and controls for the CNSC Percentage of regulations, regulatory documents and discussion papers published as per the Regulatory Framework Plan 80 percent (13 completed projects out of 17 planned) 60 percent (10 completed projects: one regulation, two discussion papers, seven regulatory documents)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

This sub-program has a strong link to the fourth organizational priority in section I. In 2013-14, the CNSC continued to strengthen its implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management; continued to uphold commitments under the RRD initiative and the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan, and continued to work with the Major Projects Management Office.

While the stretch target of 80% was not met due to project complexity and increased stakeholder consultation, 60 percent of regulations, regulatory documents and discussions papers were published as per the Regulatory Framework Plan for this period.

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Sub-program: Domestic and International Arrangements

This sub-program aims to establish and maintain collaboration with other organizations within Canada and abroad to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials, and to implement measures to provide assurances of Canada's compliance with its international obligations on the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

The CNSC communicates frequently with the IAEA and other regulatory agencies to exchange information and contribute to the development of standards pertaining to nuclear regulation. The CNSC ensures Canada's compliance with the Canada-IAEA Safeguards Agreement and the Additional Protocol to that agreement.

The CNSC also implements the non-proliferation and import-export control provisions of Canada's bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements, which provide for all nuclear trade to be carried out in accordance with Canada's nuclear non-proliferation policy and obligations under the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

These agreements establish reciprocal obligations that are designed to minimize the risk of proliferation associated with the international transfer of major nuclear items. The CNSC participates with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada in the negotiation of the agreements and implements administrative arrangements with its foreign counterparts to effectively fulfil the terms and conditions of these agreements.

Table 12 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the domestic and international arrangements sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 12: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10,394,128 10,744,601 350,473

Table 13 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the domestic and international arrangements sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 13: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
57 56 (1)

Table 14 below aligns the domestic and international arrangements sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 14: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
International transfers of nuclear materials and technology are solely for peaceful purposes Nuclear goods and technology exported from Canada under bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements remained in peaceful use Positive IAEA conclusion reached in all recipient countries Met: positive conclusion reached

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In December 2013, the CNSC President signed an MOU with DFO outlining areas for cooperation in the administration of the Fisheries Act. On the international front, the Canada-India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement and the supporting Appropriate Agreement came into force on September 27, 2013. As a result, the CNSC is currently negotiating an MOU for the exchange of information, technology and personnel.

In 2013-14, the CNSC also carried out negotiations on new and amended bilateral MOUs and on one technical agreement pursuant to Canada's bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements. As of March 31, 2014, 26 domestic arrangements were in effect and maintained by the CNSC. Twenty-six administrative arrangements, pursuant to nuclear cooperation agreements, were in effect as of December 31, 2013, 11 on export and import of radioactive sources and 15 international MOUs.

The expected result for this sub-program was met, as a positive IAEA conclusion was reached.

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Sub-program: Regulatory Research

This sub-program administers funds to conduct research projects that generate objective, scientific and technical information in order to address any potential regulatory gaps, to support regulatory decision-making by both the Commission and CNSC staff, and to help disseminate objective scientific information to the public.

Table 15 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the regulatory research sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 15: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,801,236 3,929,407 128,171

Table 16 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the regulatory research sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 16: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
21 21 0

Table 17 below aligns the regulatory research sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 17: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Research generated to support regulatory decision making Projects completed as per the research plan (schedule performance) 18 out of 35 projects 72 percent (13 projects)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the Research and Support Program spent $2.75 million on 35 projects, 25 contributions and eight grants-up from $2.53 million in 2012-13. Most research projects are undertaken over the course of multiple years; during this year, 13 of the 35 projects were completed. As part of ongoing efforts to improve the dissemination of scientific and technical information related to the CNSC's regulatory mandate, these research reports are available through the CNSC website (except where confidential for security reasons). As mentioned in priority 10 in section I, the CNSC's research also contributed to the significant efforts made by CNSC staff to further the understanding of regulatory science: CNSC staff prepared 25 technical papers and four peer-reviewed journal articles over the last year, such as the Radiation and Incidence of Cancer Around Ontario Nuclear Power Plants from 1990 to 2008 (The RADICON Study) Summary Report. Details of the CNSC's research efforts are in a recently published report, The Science of Safety, CNSC Research Report 2012-14, which is available on the CNSC website.Footnote xii

The expected result for this sub-program was mostly met, as the majority of research projects were executed as planned, with five projects being subject to some delay.

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Sub-program: Stakeholder Engagement

This sub-program administers funds with the aim of ensuring that the CNSC's licensees, regulatory partners, non-licensees and non-governmental organizations are informed of the role of the CNSC and its activities, policies and programs.

This sub-program is based on the CNSC's legislated authority to provide objective scientific and technical information about the nuclear activities that it regulates, and to engage the CNSC's stakeholders with the aim of soliciting their input on regulatory issues.

Public input, in the form of written submissions or oral interventions at Commission proceedings, influences the quality of the CNSC's work and offers an important perspective for the Commission's consideration in its decision-making process.

Table 18 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the stakeholder engagement sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 18: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,535,366 5,722,009 186,643

Table 19 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the stakeholder engagement sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 19: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
30 30 0

Table 20 below aligns the stakeholder engagement sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 20: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased stakeholder understanding of the regulatory program Number of stakeholders participating in CNSC stakeholder engagement activities
(CNSC 101 activitiesFootnote xiii)
Not applicable (to be developed with trend data) 502
(155 percent increase from 2012-13)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC confirmed outreach and engagement as an organizational priority, and approved a new approach. CNSC's outreach activities are meant to demystify nuclear science, describe the CNSC's role as Canada's nuclear regulator and bring a CNSC face into communities across the country. To deliver on these activities, staff from across the organization-experts in the fields of nuclear science and safety-have committed to participate.

Our experts are also requested to present technical papers and presentations about the nuclear industry at conferences, seminars, technical meetings and workshops held both in Canada and around the world; their technical articles are often published in various journals. Abstracts of the 17 scientific and technical papers or journal articles, and electronic copies of the 48 presentations completed in 2013-14 by CNSC management and staff, are published on the CNSC website. Members of the public can also receive copies of the documents by contacting the CNSC.

In April 2013, the CNSC hosted the IAEA's International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems meeting in Ottawa. The conference was the first major event specifically devoted to nuclear regulatory systems since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi. Nearly 300 attendees from more than 50 countries participated. Topics included regulatory lessons learned and actions taken, waste management and spent fuel safety, emergency management, emerging programs, and safety and security culture.

In 2013-14, the CNSC continued its focus on stakeholder engagement. Over the course of the year, CNSC 101 sessions were offered in 16 different locations to over 500 participants. CNSC 101 is now adapted to the target region and timing available. A communication strategy has been developed that includes targeted ads and calls to community groups, libraries, community centres, universities, colleges, students associations, chambers of commerce, aboriginal groups and others to encourage participation.

The expected result for this sub-program was met by more than doubling the number of stakeholders reached through CNSC 101 sessions compared to last year.

As a result of the sub-programs under the regulatory framework program, licensees and Canadians can benefit from ongoing improvements to how the Canadian nuclear industry is regulated.

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Program: Licensing and Certification

The licensing and certification program is in place to issue licences or certify persons and prescribed equipment for conducting nuclear-related activities in Canada. With this program's funding, the CNSC obtains evidence of an applicant's ability to operate safely and comply with all regulatory requirements. The CNSC undertakes this work to ensure that nuclear activities and facilities in Canada are managed with adequate provisions for the protection of the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment, and for the fulfilment of international commitments to the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

Table 21 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the licensing and certification program for the next three fiscal years.

Table 21: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
28,505,451 29,654,313 25,737,960 24,072,978 (5,581,335)*

*The variance between planned and actual expenditures is mostly explained by a decrease in planned vendor design reviews and licensing of new-build projects.

Table 22 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the licensing and certification program for 2013-14.

Table 22: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
188 178 (10)

Table 23 below aligns the licensing and certification program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 23: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Licences and certificates issued as per regulatory requirements Licensing decisions are issued within timelines defined by external performance standards Per external performance standards Met: refer to Table 30 below

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC continued regulatory oversight (licensing, certification and compliance verification) for almost 1,800 licensees of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and Class II nuclear facilities involved. The Commission held hearings for the licensing of NPPs, uranium mines and mills, and processing research facilities.

Regulatory oversight of the Port Hope Area Initiative continued. In the Port Granby and Port Hope waste-management facilities, there is currently a new water system under construction and commissioning. The resurveying of private and municipal properties is underway.

Analysis of aging reactor operations, including fitness for service and development of a strategy for the preservation of safety margins remains a priority. As mentioned under the regulatory framework program, the regulatory document entitled Aging Management was published in March 2014, replacing the Aging Management for Nuclear Power Plants regulatory document. The new document not only sets out requirements, as in the previous document, but also sets out guidance for the management of aging throughout different phases of a power reactor facility's lifecycle.

The expected result for this program was met, with the CNSC having issued 98 percent of the licensing decisions not requiring a hearing, and 100 percent of the licensing decisions requiring a hearing, within the stipulated timelines.

A complete record of proceedings and decisions, as well as hearing transcripts, is available on the CNSC website at nuclearsafety.gc.ca, or upon request from the CNSC.

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Sub-program: Application Assessment

This sub-program administers funds to assess the capability of applicants to meet regulatory requirements associated with their proposed activities. This assessment may include a review of the corporate status, financial viability and EAs as required by the CEAA 2012 and the NSCA, and verification of the applicant's capability to meet safety, design, engineering and other technical requirements.

The CNSC requires evidence that applicants have the necessary programs, processes and qualified staff to support their ongoing or proposed activities. For existing licences and certificates, the CNSC also requires evidence of satisfactory performance. This program also aims to address the certification of operating personnel (such as radiation safety officers in hospitals), and certification processes for radiation devices and for packaging and transport of nuclear materials.

Table 24 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the application assessment sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 24: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
23,723,450 19,258,382 (4,465,068)

Table 25 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the application assessment sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 25: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
150 142 (8)

Table 26 below aligns the application assessment sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 26: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risk-informed review of licensing applications to ensure applications meet regulatory requirements Percentage of applications that meet the regulatory requirements associated with the proposed activity 100 percent 100 percent

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Licence application assessments for five uranium mines and mills were conducted and licensing hearings were held in 2013-14. Over 700 applications were assessed for nuclear substances, prescribed equipment, Class II nuclear facilities, and import and export licences.

Regulatory reviews of non-reactor applications continued in 2013-14. In recent years, the CNSC has experienced steady growth in the number of new isotope production accelerators; in fact, four new facilities were added in 2013-14 alone and a total of 11 in the previous three years.

The CNSC continued to review applications from companies that have expressed interest in establishing new uranium projects: AREVA Resources Canada for its Kiggavik mine project (Nunavut) and Cameco Corporation for the Millennium mine project (Saskatchewan).

In 2013-14, the CNSC also reviewed nuclear reactor designs of three vendors and submitted the respective reports to proponents, namely AECL's EC-6, Westinghouse's AP-1000 and Areva/Mitsubishi's ATMEA 1. Although vendor design reviews are neither licensing nor certifications of persons or equipment, they are major coordinated technical assessment activities to inform licensing and certification decisions.

The draft regulatory document entitled Environmental Protection: Environmental Protection Policies, Programs and Procedures was completed. This document describes the conduct for EAs under the NSCA and the CEAA, 2012. Public review is anticipated in early 2014-15.

The expected result for this sub-program was met, as 100 percent of all requested licences and certifications were fully assessed to CNSC standards, with information requests made where additional details were needed to complete the licensing/certification activities.

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Sub-program: Licensing and Certification Decisions

In this sub-program, funds are administered as part of the process of issuing, amending, renewing, suspending or revoking licences or certificates. The Commission is the overall decision-making authority for all licensing matters. Some licensing matters involve public hearings before the Commission, with CNSC staff making recommendations and receiving input from stakeholders. Certain categories of licences are issued by CNSC designated officers under the authority of the NSCA.

The CNSC's consideration and issuance of licences for the export and import of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information further ensure that Canada meets its international obligations and commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and materials.

Table 27 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the licensing and certification decisions sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 27: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,930,863 4,814,596 (1,116,267)

Table 28 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the licensing and certification decisions sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 28: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
38 36 (2)

Table 29 below aligns the licensing and certification decisions sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 29: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Timely, risk-informed licensing and certification decisions Licensing decisions are issued within timelines defined by external performance standards Per external performance standards Met: refer to table 30

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC renewed the licences for all of Cameco's uranium mines and mills (Key Lake, Rabbit Lake and McArthur River) in northern Saskatchewan. In addition, Cameco's Cigar Lake mine, also in northern Saskatchewan, was issued its first operating licence. The CNSC also issued almost 500 export licences for nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information; over 212 export licences for risk-significant radioactive sources; and over 150 import licences for nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information.

In 2013-14, the CNSC also began licensing all particle accelerators operating at a beam energy level of 1 megaelectron-volt or more. This technology enables physicians to more accurately target small tumours in the body, and hybrid devices provide the ability to image and treat patients using the same machine. At the end of 2013-14, there were 53 low-energy accelerators licensed in Canada. The decision to regulate low-energy accelerators ensures adequate and consistent regulatory oversight of this class of equipment.

Furthermore, the two licences for the Pickering NPPs A and B were amalgamated under one licence and renewed in 2013, as the nuclear generating station prepares to cease operation in 2020 after almost 50 years of service.

The expected result for this program was met, with the CNSC having issued 98% of the licensing decisions not requiring a hearing, and 100 percent of the licensing decisions requiring a hearing, within the stipulated timelines.

Table 30 below presents the CNSC's external performance standards for the licensing and certification program for 2013-14.

Table 30: External Performance Standards Results - Licensing
Licensing: For applications pertaining to a new licence, renewal, amendment or deviation, the CNSC will:
Activity Performance standard Target
%
Results
%
2011-12
Results
%
2012-13
Results
%
2013-14
Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is not required Within 80 business days 80 91 98 98
Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is requiredFootnote 2 Within 160 business days 90 100 79 100

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Program: Compliance

The compliance program is in place to ensure that CNSC licensees exhibit a high level of compliance with the CNSC's regulatory framework. This program enables the CNSC to provide regulatory assurances to Canadians of the continuing compliance and safety performance of licensees. This program's funding is used to:

  • ensure licensees fully understand how to achieve compliance;
  • promote development of a healthy safety culture and common safety values;
  • verify compliance through inspections and other assessments of licensee performance; and
  • take necessary enforcement actions on observed non-compliance.

Table 31 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the compliance program for 2013-14.

Table 31: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
36,550,986 38,922,806 52,018,971 48,652,198 9,729,392*

*The variance between planned and actual expenditures is explained by the re-alignment of work priorities from the licensing and certification program to compliance verification activities and investments in compliance reporting information systems. The shift of priorities partially stems from the direction that the federal/provincial governments have communicated regarding new projects.

Table 32 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the compliance program for 2013-14.

Table 32: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
256 263 7

Table 33 below aligns the compliance program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 33: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Licensees comply with the regulatory framework Compliance activity reports are issued to licensees within timelines defined by external performance standards Per external performance standards Met: refer to tables 37 (Verification) and 41 (Enforcement)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC carried out 1,778 targeted inspections and 4,698 desktop reviewsFootnote 3 and annual compliance report verifications, relative to over 2,700 licences held by almost 1,800 licensees, thus holding licensees accountable to ensure safe conduct of activities.

In 2013, all nuclear facilities in Canada operated safely, making adequate provisions to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. No radiological releases from NPPs exceeded the regulatory limits, and licensees complied with the licence conditions. There were no events at Canada's uranium processing facilities with consequences to public health or the environment.

In terms of doses resulting from the use of nuclear devices in 2013-14, only one nuclear energy worker in the industrial sector received a dose above the regulatory dose limit of 50 millisieverts (mSv) per year. Also in the industrial sector, there was an event in March 2014 in which 10 non-nuclear workers received radiation doses above the annual regulatory dose limit for members of the public of 1 mSv. During the same year, three non-nuclear hospital workers received doses above the regulatory dose limit for a member of the public of 1 mSv per year. No immediate health effects are expected as a result of any of these events. Each case was individually reviewed by CNSC staff. CNSC staff followed up with the licensees to ensure that the applicable requirements of section 16 of the Radiation Protection Regulations, for situations in which a dose limit is exceeded, were met.

The expected result for this program was met, with the CNSC having met or surpassed the targets of issuing compliance activity reports within stipulated timelines.

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Sub-program: Verification

This sub-program administers funds to verify compliance through site inspections, the review of operational activities and licensee documentation. The CNSC requires licensees to report routine performance data and unusual occurrences, and conducts investigations of unplanned events or accidents involving nuclear materials or substances in Canada.

Table 34 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the verification sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 34: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
35,030,525 43,786,978 8,756,453

Table 35 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the verification sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 35: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
230 237 7

Table 36 below aligns the verification sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 36: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Verification activities conducted to ensure compliance with the NSCA, regulations and licences Compliance verification activity reports are issued to licensees within timelines defined by external performance standards Per external performance standards Met: refer to table 37 below.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC continued its commitment to verification through the conduct of planned and unplanned inspections as necessary, desktop reviews and annual compliance report verifications.

The CNSC also made improvements to its online reporting tools for selected licensees with the introduction of nuclear material accountancy reporting (NMAR), and is currently exploring options for expanding access to annual compliance reporting online to all licensees of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and Class II nuclear facilities. To accommodate the new electronic reporting, the former nuclear material accounting system was modified. Five out of the 40 potential licensees eligible to use NMAR so far have submitted reports through the system, as of March 31, 2014. The CNSC continued to maintain its timely reporting commitments to the IAEA.

The 2013-14 fiscal year also marked the second year of the Independent Environmental Monitoring Program. During this year, the program verified seven sites and found no risk to the public or the environment. Of particular interest this past year was the independent monitoring of the levels of uranium in soil samples from the GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc. (GEH-C) uranium dioxide facility and surrounding area in Toronto, Ontario. The CNSC published the findings and test results in October 2013 in the report Uranium Levels in Soil Samples Around GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Toronto Facility, which is available on the CNSC website.

The expected result for this program was met, with the CNSC having met or surpassed the targets of issuing verification activity reports within stipulated timelines.

Table 37 below presents the CNSC's external performance standards for the verification sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 37: External Performance Standards Results - Verification
Verification: Upon completion of the verification activity, the CNSC will:
Activity Performance Standard Target
%
Results
%
2011-12
Results
%
2012-13
Results
%
2013-14
Issue Type I Inspection Preliminary Report At the Type I Inspection Exit Meeting 100 100 100 100
Issue Type I Inspection Report Within 60 business days 80 88 96 83
Issue Type II Inspection Report Within 40 business daysFootnote 4 80 80 93 91
Issue Desktop Review Report Within 60 business days 90 93 98 92

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Sub-program: Enforcement

This sub-program administers funds to address cases where compliance is unsatisfactory. The CNSC uses a graduated approach to enforcement, based on risk significance. The Commission may order licensees to appear at one of its proceedings, and may impose restrictions or revoke licences.

Through inspectors and designated officers, the CNSC also enforces compliance by applying such legal instruments as issuing orders, issuing administrative monetary penalties (AMP's) or recommending prosecution under the NSCA.

Table 38 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for the enforcement sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 38: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,892,281 4,378,698 486,417

Table 39 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for the enforcement sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 39: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
26 26 0

Table 40 below aligns the enforcement sub-program's expected result with its corresponding target and performance status.

Table 40: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Graduated enforcement to ensure timely response for addressing non-compliances Decisions about orders are issued to licensees within timelines defined by external performance standards Per external performance standards Met: refer to table 41 below

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, the CNSC issued 18 orders to specific licensees using nuclear substances. These orders typically required the licensee to cease using a nuclear-related device until it had complied with CNSC requirements. Three AMPs were also issued in 2013-14 for various violations of regulatory requirements. These were the first AMPs issued under the new Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations, which came into force in July 2013. Please consult the CNSC website for a list of all regulatory actions.

The expected result for this program was met, with the CNSC having communicated to the appropriate licensee the decision made about an order within stipulated timelines 100 percent of the time.

Table 41 below presents the CNSC's external performance standards for the enforcement sub-program for 2013-14.

Table 41: External Performance Standards Results - Enforcement
Enforcement: When decision about an order is made, the CNSC will:
Activity Performance Standard Target
%
Results
%
2011-12
Results
%
2012-13
Results
%
2013-14
Provide the decision in writing on whether to confirm, amend, revoke or replace the order (see CNSC Rules of Procedures) Within 10 business days 100 100 100 100

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Program: Internal Services

Internal services are activities and resources that apply across the organization to support program delivery and to meet other corporate obligations of the CNSC. These activities consist of management and oversight (including audits and evaluations), communications, legal services, human resources management, financial management, information management, information technology, corporate security and real property acquisition, travel and other administrative services.

Table 42 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual spending for internal services for 2013-14.

Table 42: Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
42,651,522 43,924,178 46,117,462 45,355,707 1,431,529

Table 43 below presents the CNSC's planned and actual human resources for internal services for 2013-14.

Table 43: Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
234 231 3

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Through the 2013 Budget Implementation Act, the NSCA has been amended to authorize the CNSC to spend for its purposes the revenue from the fees it charges for licences or classes of licences in the fiscal year in which the revenues are received or in the next fiscal year.

In 2013-14, a cost-benefit analysis of different acceptable financial guarantee instruments for Class II and nuclear substances and devices licensees was also completed. A group insurance model option was found to be the most viable and economical instrument for licensees. Further developments on this are expected in 2014-15.

In light of a recent slow-down in the nuclear industry, planned resource reductions have been actioned. The CNSC has been very efficient in managing reductions that affect both salaries and non-salaries. New processes have been launched for staffing approvals, which have provided significant support in the reduction exercise; furthermore, priority has been given to reallocations and transfers rather than new resources. In 2013-14, there were 70 employee assignments and transfers, which allowed the CNSC to respond to changing workload demands while also contributing to staff development and mobility. The latter was further enhanced by investments in learning of approximately $2.2 million.

The organization also continued to make progress in modernizing its information management and technology practices. The Government of Canada Web Renewal Initiative was launched during the fiscal year. The deployment of Windows 7 and MS Office 2010 was mostly completed; and the implementation of the Directive on Recordkeeping remains on schedule to meet the 2015 target completion date.

Table 44 below presents the CNSC's external performance standards for the internal services program for 2013-14.

Table 44: External Performance Standards - Internal Services
Activity Performance Standard Target
%
Results
%
Results
%
Results
%
2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Access to Information
Respond to requests under the Access to Information Act (ATI) and Privacy Act Within legislated time periods as stated in the acts 100 ATI - 86; Privacy - N/A ATI - 66;
Privacy - N/A
ATI - 53;Footnote 5
Privacy - 66
 
Place public hearings advertisements Within deadlines stipulated in the regulations 100 100 100 100
Follow the appropriate standard for response time to public inquiries Same-day acknowledgement, with response time for completion of the request depending upon complexity: 100 100 100 100
Low - same day 100% 100% 100% 100%
Medium - within 5 business days 100% 95% 95% 95%
High - within 10 business days 100% 90% 95% 93%

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Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

The CNSC reports on a full accrual accounting basis, according to the Treasury Board's policy based on generally accepted accounting principles. The tables below provide highlights from the CNSC's statement of financial position and statement of operations, as presented in its audited financial statements. As such, there are differences between these tables and those presented in other sections of the Departmental Performance Report, which are prepared on the modified cash basis of accounting.

Table 45: Condensed Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position
CNSC
Condensed statement of operations and net financial position
for the year ending March 31, 2014
($ dollars)
  2013-14
Planned
Results
2013-14
Actual
2012-13
Actual
Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 planned) Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2012-13 actual)
Total expenses 153,992,000 149,114,244 156,024,000 4,877,756 6,907,407
Total revenues 108,085,000 103,460,701 109,794,000 4,624,299 6,332,871
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 45,907,000 45,653,543 46,230,000 253,457 574,536
Net financial position (10,680,000) (185,674) (10,622,845) 10,494,326 10,437,171

The planned results for fiscal year 2013-14 are as set out in the Future Oriented Financial Statements that were published within the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The CNSC's total expenses decreased 4.6 percent or $6.9 million, while revenues decreased 5.8 percent or $6.3 million in fiscal year 2013-14. The total decrease in expenses and revenues was primarily due to a reduction of 20 FTEs related to Hydro-Québec's announcement to shut down the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station. It is also attributable to a decrease in the liability for employee future benefits and a decrease in revenue from special projects.

Table 46: Condensed Statement of Financial Position
CNSC condensed statement of financial position at March 31, 2014
($ dollars)
  2013-14 2012-13 Difference
(2013-14 minus
2012-13)
Total net liabilities 41,518,889 50,362,861 8,843,972
Total net financial assets 29,145,325 25,274,868 3,870,457
Net debt 12,373,564 25,087,993 12,714,429
Total non-financial assets 12,187,890 14,465,148 2,277,258
Net financial position (185,674) (10,622,845) 10,437,171

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The decrease in the CNSC's net liabilities was mainly due to a decrease in the liability for employee future benefits, due to the Government of Canada's decision to stop employee accumulation of voluntary severance and to allow cash-out of existing amounts. This decrease was offset by an increase in the accounts payable for refunds owing to licensees, due to lower expenses than initially planned when initial 2013-14 licence fees were set.

The change in the CNSC's net financial assets is attributed to amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund because of refunds owing to licensees.

The change in the CNSC's non-financial assets was a result of a decrease in purchases of tangible capital assets, as well as increased annual amortization exceeding the value of in-year purchased capital assets.

The graphs below represent the CNSC's cost of operations and revenues by expense and revenue category.

Figure 2: Cost of CNSC operations by category

Data for Figure 2
Total Cost of Operations
Operations Costs
Salaries and employee
benefits
104,602,108
Professional and Special Services 20,855,958
Accommodation 9,161,388
Travel and relocation 4,617,525
Amortization 3,240,498
Furniture, repairs and rentals 2,968,955
Communication and information 1,167,911
Grants and contributions 1,723,630
Utilities, materials and
supplies
606,047
Other 170,224
Total Expenses 149,114,244
Net cost from continuing operations 45,653,543

Figure 3: CNSC revenues by category

Data for Figure 3
Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position for the year ended March 31(in dollars)
Revenues 2013-14
License fees 101,446,105
Special Projects 1,977,884
Other 36,712
Total Revenues 103,460,701

Financial Statements

Further details on the CNSC's finances are detailed in its audited financial statements, which are published in the annual report. The CNSC's annual reports can be accessed from the CNSC website .Footnote xiv

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Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the CNSC websiteFootnote xv.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsFootnote xvi publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Michael Albert
Director
Corporate Planning Division
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
Telephone: (613) 943-7664
Email: michael.albert@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Expenditures that include operating and capital expenditures, transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals, and payments to Crown corporations.
departmental performance report
A report on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding reports on plans and priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
management, resources and results structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the strategic outcome(s) to which they contribute. The management, resources and results structure is developed from the program alignment architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures
Expenditures that include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, and that change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information -- performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tends to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending
For reports on plans and priorities and departmental performance reports, those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

priorities
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired strategic outcomes.
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
program alignment architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the strategic outcomes to which they contribute.
report on plans and priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
result
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization's influence.
strategic outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
whole-of-government framework
A framework that maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

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Footnotes

Footnote i

Government of Canada, Financial Administration Act, laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-11

Return to footnote i referrer

Footnote ii

Government of Canada, Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/c-15.21/index.html

Return to footnote ii referrer

Footnote iii

Government of Canada, Nuclear Liability Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-28/

Return to footnote iii referrer

Footnote iv

United Nations, Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NPT

Return to footnote iv referrer

Footnote v

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/pubs_catalogue/uploads/INFO-0828-Draft-CNSC-Staff-Action-Plan-on-Fukushima-Dec-2011_e.PDF

Return to footnote v referrer

Footnote vi

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CNSC Integrated Action Plan on the Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/resources/publications/reports/action-plan-fukushima

Return to footnote vi referrer

Footnote vii

Natural Resources Canada, Major Project Management Office, mpmo.gc.ca

Return to footnote vii referrer

Footnote viii

Government of Canada, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Cost Recovery Fees Regulation,
laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/sor-2003-212

Return to footnote viii referrer

Footnote ix

Whole-of-government framework, tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng

Return to footnote ix referrer

Footnote x

Public Accounts of Canada 2014, tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/cpc-pac

Return to footnote x referrer

Footnote xi

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Regulatory Framework Plan 2012-18, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/pdfs/regulatory-framework/Regulatory-Framework_Plan-March-2013-eng.PDF

Return to footnote xi referrer

Footnote xii

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Reports, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/resources/publications/reports

Return to footnote xii referrer

Footnote xiii

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CNSC 101, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/stay-connected/get-involved/cnsc-101

Return to footnote xiii referrer

Footnote xiv

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Annual Reports, http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/resources/publications/reports/annual-reports/index.cfm

Return to footnote xiv referrer

Footnote xv

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Departmental Performance Reports, nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/readingroom/reports/departmental

Return to footnote xv referrer

Footnote xvi

Government of Canada Tax Expenditures and Evaluations, fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng

Return to footnote xvi referrer

Table Footnotes

Footnote 1

This project was subsequently postponed at the request of the proponent.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The hearing process does not apply to licensing and certification activities that are related to nuclear substances, radiation devices, Class II facilities, prescribed equipment, transport and packaging.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Desktop reviews are all verification activities limited to the review of documents and reports submitted by licensees. This includes quarterly technical reports, annual compliance reports, special reports and documentation related to design, safety analysis, programs and procedures. It does not include document reviews that are part of licensing activities or inspections.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Power reactor licensees are provided 10 working days beyond the exit meeting to supply supplemental information; the above results take into consideration this allowance.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

The results for 2013-14 were lower due to increased volume and complexity of ATI requests.

Return to footnote 5 referrer