Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Annual Report 2006-2007

The Commission Members

Linda J. Keen
Linda J. Keen
President, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
Ottawa, Ontario

Ms. Keen was appointed a full-time Commission member effective November 1, 2000, and assumed her duties as President and Chief Executive Officer of the CNSC on January 1, 2001.

Christopher R. Barnes
Christopher R. Barnes Professor, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences and Project Director for Project Neptune Canada at the University of Victoria,
Victoria, British Columbia

Dr. Barnes was appointed a Commission member on January 23, 1996.

James A. Dosman
James A. Dosman
Director, Institute of Agricultural Rural and Environmental Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Dr. Dosman was appointed a Commission member on May 30, 2002.

Alan R. Graham
Alan R. Graham
Rexton, New Brunswick

Mr. Graham was appointed a Commission member on January 1, 1999.

André Harvey
André Harvey
Québec, Québec

Mr. Harvey was appointed a Commission memeber on June 2, 2006.

J. Moyra
J. Moyra J. McDill
Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Carleton University,
Ottawa, Ontario

Dr. McDill was appointed a Commission member on May 30, 2002.

Jean-Guy Paquet
Jean-Guy Paquet
Chairman, Board of the National Optics Institute,
Québec, Québec

Dr. Paquet was appointed a Commission member on June 2, 2006.



Message from the President

The mission of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment, and to respect Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. As President of the CNSC, I am pleased to report on the Tribunal’s accomplishments for the year 2006-07.

The CNSC has regulatory oversight of more than 2,500 nuclear operations and applications across Canada, from nuclear power plants and uranium mines to radioisotope sources used to treat cancer. Functioning as an independent federal quasi-judicial administrative tribunal and court of record, the Commission sets regulatory policy directions under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act on matters relating to health, safety, security and the protection of the environment and makes legally binding regu­lations. It also renders licensing decisions for major nuclear facilities such as power reactors, uranium mines and mills, waste facilities, and research and production facilities. The Commission delegates responsibility for decisions on other licences, such as those for nuclear substances.

The CNSC public hearing process remains the most visible activity of the Commission and is a valued and important part of the licensing process. Canada is seen as having one of the most open and transparent nuclear regulatory processes in the world. The Commission encourages people to par­ticipate in public hearings for major nuclear facilities, to ensure Canada’s nuclear regime reflects the diverse needs and concerns of Canadians. It makes it a priority to listen and communicate with all stakeholders to ensure it understands and considers their perspectives when making decisions. In support of this commitment, the Commission held numerous public hearings in affected Canadian communities over the past year, listening to more than 600 interventions. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the intervenors for their time and effort in participating at hearings and for making their voices heard.

The Canadian nuclear industry is experiencing substantial growth in all areas, be these power generation, uranium mining and milling, waste management or industrial and medical applications. Industry is pursuing the refurbishment of power reactors, and the Commission also received applications for preparing sites for new power reactors during the past year. This industry growth translates to an increased workload for the Commission, which saw a particularly busy year in 2006-07. Last year, it received close to 50 applications that ranged from administrative requests to complex applications, such as those for new reactor builds and a deep geological repository for low and medium-level waste. To handle increased demand and workload in the most effective and efficient manner, the Commission has implemented a streamlined process whereby it uses panels to hold the majority of licensing hearings.

The Commission is acutely aware of the responsibilities bestowed upon it to act as Canada’s nuclear watchdog in a fair and transparent manner. The Canadian public can be confident that the Commission remains committed to ensuring the safe and secure use and operation of nuclear facilities. As the nuclear industry expands, the CNSC assures Canadians that it will continue to respect its mandate of protecting the health, safety and security of its only client - the people of Canada - and of protecting the environment and respecting Canada’s commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

Sincerely,

[ original signed by Linda J. Keen ]

Linda J. Keen, M.Sc.

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Annual Report of the Commission Tribunal 2006-2007

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission1 regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment and to respect Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Functioning as an independent federal quasi-judicial administrative tribunal and court of record, the Commission consists of up to seven members appointed by the Governor in Council, who hold office during good behaviour. The President is a full-time Commission member and other members serve on a part-time basis. Commission members are appointed based on their credentials and are not linked to the nuclear industry. They are independ­ent of all influences, be they political, governmental, special interest groups or the private sector. Commission members are also independent of each other and from CNSC staff.

The Commission acts as a tribunal, making independent decisions on the licensing of nuclear-related activities in Canada. Its main functions are established in the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, the Nuclear Security Regulations and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission By-laws. The Commission also has powers and responsibilities under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. By directing and implementing a thorough, independent and rigorous licensing and certification process, the Commission plays a key role in ensuring individuals and organizations wishing to use nuclear energy and materials in Canada operate safely and conform to safeguards and nuclear non-proliferation requirements.

The Commission sets regulatory policy direction on the protection of health, safety, security and the environment in respect of the Canadian nuclear industry. It also makes legally binding regulations and independent licensing decisions for major nuclear facilities, taking into account the views, concerns and opinions of interested parties and intervenors.

To promote openness and transparency, the Commission conducts business to the greatest extent possible in public hearings and meetings. It streamlines processes with the objective of carrying out its activities in a fair, informal and expeditious manner. Where feasible, it holds hearings in affected communities and uses telecommunication and other technologies to increase access to proceedings and relevant documentation. With respect to licensing matters, the Commission considers applicant proposals, CNSC staff recommendations and the views of stakeholders before making decisions. The Commission has delegated its authority to CNSC staff to make licensing decisions for some licensees, such as those for nuclear materials.

The Commission is supported by the Secretariat of the Commission. The Secretariat manages the business of the Commission and provides commu­nications, technical and administrative support to the President and other Commission members. It is also the official registrar in relation to Commission documentation.

Regulatory Framework

The Commission is committed to an effective regulatory regime based on modern legislation and clear, modern, risk-informed regulatory approaches. The regulatory framework must effectively address nuclear-related issues with respect to health, safety, security and the environment.

As the Commission has evolved, its priorities have expanded to ensure an evergreen approach to Canada’s nuclear regulatory framework. In view of this greater emphasis on the regulatory framework, the Commission concentrated more resources in this area during 2006-07, including the following:

  • Nuclear Security Regulations
    Amended Nuclear Security Regulations were issued and came into force in November 2006. These ensure Canada has a robust framework for physical security at major nuclear facilities, in line with modern requirements with respect to site security and anti-terrorism measures.

  • Nuclear Security Regulations and Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission By-laws
    Scheduled work to amend the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Rules of Procedure and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission By-laws is a continuous improvement initiative. This project continued to move forward, although progress over the past year was slower than anticipated due to an increased Commission workload.

  • Standing Joint Committee on the Scrutiny of Regulations
    Recommendations from the Standing Joint Committee on the Scrutiny of Regulations have been received and are scheduled to go before the Commission in 2007-08.

CNSC staff support

The Commission operates separately from CNSC staff, setting policy directions on matters relating to health, safety, security and environmental issues that affect the Canadian nuclear industry. As the Commission is expanding its role in regulatory policymaking, a Regulatory Policy Committee chaired by the Secretary of the Commission has been established with the CNSC staff. This committee aims to provide strategic-level direction and to coordinate the identification, development and implementation of a revised CNSC regulatory policy framework. Throughout 2006-07, the committee examined policies and standards with a view to modernizing and strengthening the regulatory framework and to providing consistency to the regulatory process, from concept to the approval process for the Commission and broader consultation with stakeholders.


Licensing

The Commission makes licensing decisions based on the qualifications of facility operators and the adequacy of provisions made to protect the health and safety of persons, the environment, and the maintenance of national security and measures required to implement international obligations to which Canada has agreed.

As the most visible component of the CNSC, the Commission conducts public hearings on licensing matters pertaining to major nuclear facilities. In 2006-2007, the Commission conducted 49 hearings, where it duly considered submissions from applicants and input from CNSC expert staff and interested stakeholders and documented them in detailed records of proceedings. This represent­ed a 69% increase in the number of hearings over the past year as compared to those that took place in 2005-06. The average 18-day period to release a decision this year was significantly better than the performance standard of 30 business days, and 36 decisions were released within this 30-day standard - representing turnaround times that surpass best practices of the Canadian administrative tribunal community. In instances where performance standards were not met, reasons for delay included the Commission’s greatly increased workload, a higher number of complex hearings, and the conduct of several hearings in affected communities.

Streamlining operations

Hearings conducted by Panels of the Commission

With the aim of increasing efficiency of the Commission’s operations and maintaining their effectiveness, the CNSC President established several panels of one or more members to exercise Commission functions throughout the past year. This practical use of the Commission tribunal’s resources demonstrates commitment towards good governance while delivering the CNSC’s mandate through timely licensing decisions. Powers conferred by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act on the Commission are exercised collectively by the Members of the Commission. However, the presence of all Commission Members is not required each time the Commission acts, because a smaller panel of members may exercise certain Commission powers. This use of panels is in line with the practices of other Canadian administrative tribunals that also make the majority of their decisions using panels of members as opposed to full tribunal membership.

Abridged hearings

The Commission has moved toward holding more hearings as abridged hearings so it can operate more efficiently. Based on circumstances and the nature of the matter at hand, an abridged hearing can be held within a shorter-than-usual time frame, before a panel (requiring fewer Commission mem­bers), as a written hearing, or as a closed hearing with no opportunity for public intervention. An abridged hearing adheres to the principles of deter­mining a matter in a fair, informed, and expeditious manner. It may be appropriate if certain criteria are met - for example, if the issue is administrative, does not involve new or unproven technology, would not compromise safety, or has not generated high levels of public interest. The Commission will permit interventions in abridged hearings where warranted.

Environmental assessment guidelines

In 2005-06, the Commission streamlined the environmental assessment (EA) process to permit an appropriate balance of public consultation, regulatory effectiveness and risk-informed decision-making, and worked to implement the revised process over the last year. The changes, which have resulted in a more focused execution of responsibilities by the Commission and CNSC staff, have clarified the lines of authority between the Commission and the CNSC Designated Officers. The Commission now makes decisions on EA guidelines for Class I nuclear facilities2 and uranium mines and mills via an abridged process. Depending on the complexity of the issue, the possible impact on the environment and the level of public interest, hearings for EA Screening Reports are conducted through the abridged process or the one-day public hearing process. Members of the public still have many opportunities to present their views during consultations led by CNSC staff or the proponent at the EA screening report stage and at the licensing stage.

In addition, where warranted, the Commission will conduct a public hearing on EA Guidelines. For example, in January 2007, the Commission held a public hearing on the Environmental Assessment Guidelines for the proposed refurbishment of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station B reactors, where it considered input from CNSC staff, Ontario Power Generation Inc. and 64 intervenors.

Delegation

All EA screenings and licensing for facilities other than Class I facilities or uranium mines and mills are conducted by Designated Officers, as the responsible authorities for the licensing process. However, if there is a significant level of public interest and for matters of complexity, Designated Officers may refer the matter to the Commission, which may hold a hearing on the matter.

Major new projects

Ontario Power Generation has proposed a deep geologic repository that would be constructed within the Bruce Nuclear Power site in Kincardine, Ontario, to bury low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. In December 2006, the Commission announced its recommendation to the federal Minister of the Environment that the proposed project be referred to a review panel. This marks the first time that the Commission has referred an EA to the Minister for panel review since the establishment of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. In determining this recommendation, the CNSC consulted extensively with the neigh­bouring community, including the Saugeen Ojibway Nations.

Bruce Power and Ontario Power Generation sub­mitted applications to the CNSC to construct new power reactors. The applications to prepare sites for new reactors triggered environmental assess­ments that will require several years to complete. The Commission has already recommended to the Minister of the Environment that the environmen­tal assessment of Bruce Power’s proposed project be referred directly to a panel review under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act - to save potential duplicative effort by stakeholders and reduce the timeline by several months. The Commission will review Ontario Power Generation’s project description and make a rec­ommendation to the Minister of the Environment on the EA process.

Compliance

Achieving high levels of compliance with the nuclear regulatory framework is critical to the CNSC’s work and to assuring the safety of nuclear installations and processes. The Commission regularly receives information on licensee performance and compliance with regulatory requirements through various public reporting formats. These include annual reports on the safety performance of the power industry, mid-term performance reports for the majority of the facilities licensed by the CNSC, and significant development reports.

The Commission examined the regulatory compliance of several licensed operations at its public meetings held during 2006-07. Through a rigor‑ous reporting process on significant developments in the industry, CNSC staff apprised the Commission of events of existing or potential safety concern. These public meetings were open to the public and the transcripts and meeting minutes are published on the CNSC Web site. Public reporting provides greater openness and transparency of the CNSC’s ongoing regulatory over­sight and ensures that licensees remain accountable and take necessary actions to resolve issues, so that no unreasonable risks arise from any events that may occur.

The Commission was involved in a larger number of reviews of orders in 2006-07 than during previous reporting periods. The Commission reinforced its commitment to the safety of Canadians through its orders against licensees that were found to be non-compliant with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act or conditions of their licences. Through its orders against licensees such as Enviropac, SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc., and ESI Resources Limited, the Tribunal ensured that facilities oper­ated so as not to create unreasonable risk.

Enviropac

In September 2006, a CNSC Designated Officer issued an Order to Enviropac Inc. to immediately cease activities relating to the use, transfer, import, export and servicing of nuclear substances and pre­scribed equipment. The Order was issued based on CNSC staff concerns regarding Enviropac’s qualifications and commitment to make adequate provision for the health and safety of persons and pro­tection of the environment.

In accordance with the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations, the Order was referred to the Commission for review. In December 2006, the Commission confirmed the Order requiring Enviropac to cease all activities under its CNSC licence. CNSC staff inspected the site a number of times in the interim to verify compliance with the Designated Officer Order and to ensure that appropriate security measures were taken.

In February 2007, the Commission resumed the hearing to consider amending the Designated Officer Order, based on recommendations from CNSC staff and the licensee. Following the February hearing, CNSC staff received a report of the discovery of an orphaned sealed source con­taining a nuclear substance. The investigation car­ried out by CNSC staff showed that the sealed source was last in the possession of Enviropac. Based on the potential risk due to loss of control, CNSC staff issued further recommendations to the Commission on regulatory actions to be taken, for consideration in its deliberations. The Commission decision on the matter is expected in the upcoming fiscal year.

SRB Technologies

In August 2006, a CNSC Designated Officer issued an order to SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc. (SRBT) to cease and desist the processing and use of tritium, to prevent further damage to the environment, which had been detected in the land near the SRBT facility. Later that month, SRBT was provided with an opportunity to be heard, after which the Commission amended the order and allowed the company to resume limited production. The Commission informed SRBT that it would have to demonstrate at its licence renewal hearings in Fall 2006 that it was qualified to continue operations and was making adequate provisions to protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians and the environment. The Commission also requested a detailed report describing the actions and measures SRBT would take to identify and contain all impacts on the environment, to prevent or mitigate any further impact on the environment, and to remediate impacts on the environment.

In October 2006, the Commission held a public hearing on SRBT’s application to renew its operat­ing licence. On the first day of the hearing, CNSC staff reported that SRBT had not yet responded with the actions and measures specified earlier by the Commission. The Commission heard 93 inter‑ventions on the second day of the hearing in late November 2006, confirming a high level of public interest and concern.

The Commission considered all information presented and, in January 2007, decided not to renew SRBT’s nuclear substance processing facility operating licence. Instead, it issued a new class of licence that allowed the company to possess tritium, but not to process it.

In January 2007, the Commission directed CNSC staff to conduct research studies examining the health effects of tritium and how tritium moves through the environment, to enhance information available to guide regulatory oversight of tritium releases in Canada.

In April 2007, the Commission held a one-day public hearing where SRBT applied for a licence amendment that was subsequently granted. This amendment permitted the company to receive tritium-filled light sources from other facilities solely intended for direct onward sale to its customers, or for assembly in SRBT devices also solely intended for direct onward sale to its customers. SRBT remained unauthorized to process tritium.

ESI Resources Limited

In February 2006, ESI Resources Limited filed a licence renewal application for its Calgary standby uranium recovery facility, which did not include necessary prescribed information. CNSC staff notified the licensee of the deficiencies in its application and requested a revised submission by March 15, 2006. This information was not submitted in time despite several subsequent requests from CNSC staff.

On June 26, 2006, CNSC staff conducted an inspection of the licensee’s facility. Samples taken and analyzed revealed uranium contamination inside the dryer room and evaporation ponds. On July 31, 2006, the company’s licence expired, rendering the licensee unauthorized to process and store uranium-contaminated materials. CNSC staff issued an Order in August 2006 that ESI Resources take specified actions and measures to protect the environment from continued presence of uranium-contaminated material at the unlicensed site. The Commission is in the process of reviewing the Order with a view to replacing, amending, revoking or confirming the Order. A decision is expected during the 2007-08 fiscal year.


Cooperative Undertakings

The President of the Commission accepted the position as first Chair of the Heads of Federal Administrative Tribunals Forum, a new organization created to coordinate federal tribunal activities. This will be a forum for tribunals to build on experience, share innovative practices and take concerted approaches where appropriate.

The Commission Secretary chairs the Heads of Federal Administrative Tribunals Forum’s Official Languages Working Group. The work of this group, important in reaching Canadians efficiently and effectively in both official languages, was cited in the recent Official Languages Commissioner Annual Report as a best practice model.

The President, Secretary and General Counsel participated in activities of the Canadian Council of Administrative Tribunals, which is the forum for federal, provincial and territorial tribunal members to share best practices with each other as well as with international participants.


Protecting the environment

In 2006-07, the Commission made several deci­sions under the provisions of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act on environmental assessments of projects that would ultimately ensure licensees’ measures in place to protect the environment.

  • Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Further to a hearing in April 2006, the Commission concluded that Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)’s proposal to construct and operate a shielded modular above­ground storage facility was not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects. The proposal involved storing solid low-level radioactive wastes generated at the Chalk River Laboratories, as well as waste from off-site commercial generators.

  • AREVA Resources Canada Inc.

    In October 2006, the Commission held a hear­ing to consider the results of an environmental assessment screening of AREVA Resources Canada Inc.’s proposal to install and operate a ferric sulphate production circuit at its McClean Lake operation in northern Saskatchewan. The Commission’s consideration of the results of the assessment and the licence application allowed the project to proceed.

  • Cameco Corporation

    In December 2006, the Commission held a hearing to consider the results of an environmental assessment screening of Cameco Corporation’s proposal to modify the operation of the Blind River Refinery Incinerator in Blind River, Ontario. Proposed upgrades included the installation of pollution control equipment and on-line monitoring equipment. The Commission subsequently approved the project.

  • Rio Algom Limited

    In March 2007, the Commission held a hearing for Rio Algom Limited’s proposed project to replace its effluent treatment plan at the decommissioned Stanleigh Mine in Elliott Lake with a smaller, more energy-efficient effluent treatment facility.


Reaching Out to Communities

The Commission continued to focus on outreach and community engagement during 2006-07. Demonstrating its commitment to openness and accessibility, the Commission heard presentations and considered written submissions from more than 600 intervenors with an interest in Commission business, whose voices are a key element in making informed decisions.

In addition to First Nations, a vast and varied audience of stakeholders - including the general public, unions, academics, special interest groups and other government bodies, all with differing interests-had the opportunity to participate in public hearings. A number of intervenors voiced their support for the licence applications being considered by the Commission. Several concerns were also brought forward, covering various aspects of the industry, from environmental protection, emergency preparedness and the length of licensing periods to anti-terrorism security measures. The Commission reinforced to intervenors that safety and security are its most important priorities: It does not have an economic mandate, nor are its decisions based on the economic impact of a facility or on a decision’s potential impact on a facility.

The Commission heard concerns from several intervenors regarding its move towards issuing longer licences where a licensee’s performance warranted such action. The Commission aimed to assure the public that longer licences would allow CNSC staff and licensees to concentrate their efforts on ensuring safe operations on a daily basis and through longer-term planning. If it is determined at any time that a licensee is not adhering to its licence conditions, there is a range of possible actions that the CNSC can and will take, from review or revocation of a licence to prosecution.

To further encourage public involvement and facilitate participation in the hearing process, the Commission scheduled five public hearings in host communities in Ontario and Québec during the year. The Commission also broadcasted some public hearings using Webcasting technology.

Hearing in Kincardine, Ontario (Oct. 23, 2006) - Deep Geologic Repository

The Commission held a public hearing in Kincardine, Ontario, to consider the environmental assessment process, pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, for Ontario Power Generation’s proposal to construct and operate a deep geologic repository on the Bruce Nuclear Power site. The Commission considered written submissions and oral presentations from CNSC staff, Ontario Power Generation and 57 intervenors. Following the proceeding, the Commission recommended to the Minister of the Environment to refer the project to a review panel. The Commission’s recommendation stemmed from the unique nature of the proposed repository, which would be the first of its kind in Canada, along with concerns and uncertainties regarding the project. A panel review would also pro­vide further opportunities to participate in the process, including participant funding.

Hearings in Bécancour, Québec (Nov. 5-7, 2006) - Hydro-Québec

A public hearing was held in the community of Bécancour, Québec, to consider Hydro-Québec’s application to renew its operating licence for the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station. After considering submissions from CNSC staff, Hydro-Québec and 14 intervenors, the Commission renewed the operating licence for a period of four years until 2010.

The Commission also held a public hearing in Bécancour to consider the results of the screening envi­ronmental assessment for the proposed modifications to the Gentilly Radioactive Waste Management Facilities and the refurbishment and continued operation of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station. The Commission considered the Environmental Assessment Screening Report and written submissions and oral presentations from Hydro-Québec, CNSC staff and 49 intervenors. The Commission con­cluded that the proposed projects would not likely cause significant adverse environmental effects, tak­ing into account mitigation measures, and that it would not refer the project to the Minister of the Environment for a review panel or for mediation. The Commission therefore can proceed, under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, with its consideration of a licence application and request for approvals from Hydro-Québec for the proposed projects. A licence amendment to permit construction and oper­ation of temporary storage facilities was granted in March 2007.

Hearings in Port Hope, Ontario (Nov. 27-30, 2006) - Cameco Corporation and Zircatec Precision Industries, Inc.

The Commission held two public hearings in Port Hope to consider licence renewal applications from Cameco and Zircatec Precision Industries. These hearings garnered significant community interest as demonstrated by the nearly 300 oral and written submissions considered during three days of hearings.

Further to the hearings, the Commission renewed Zircatec’s operating licence for its nuclear fuel bun­dle fabricating facility until 2012. The Commission also renewed Cameco’s operating licence for its Port Hope conversion facility until 2012.

Demonstrating Openness and Transparency

Visiting communities and meeting with people directly or via communications technology reinforces the CNSC’s commitment to accountability, transparency and effectiveness. Building and strengthen­ing relationships with communities is an important part of regulatory business. The Commission is committed to remaining visible and accessible to the public in the years ahead by continuing to hold hearings in the affected communities and evaluating the possibilities of new technology to facilitate public participation.

To learn more about the public hearing process and how to get involved, and to view the public hearing schedule and the Commission’s decisions, visit the CNSC website. The Secretariat of the Commission can also be reached at 1-800-668-5284, 613-996-9063 (in Ottawa) or by email.

Commission Hearings

April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2007

Commission documentation is available on the CNSC Web site.


Class IA Nuclear Facilities

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited:

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a shielded modular above-ground storage facility at the Chalk River Laboratories. Abridged hearing (April 27, 2006)

  • Decision to renew the Chalk River Laboratories nuclear research and test establishment operat­ing licence. Two-day public hearing (April 26 and June 28, 2006)

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed decommissioning of the fuel storage and handling bays at the Chalk River Laboratories. Abridged hearing (October 25, 2006)

  • Decision to accept exemptions sought from the Regulations Amending the Nuclear Security Regulations. Closed hearing (December 14, 2006)

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed decommissioning of the pool test reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories. Abridged hearing (February 7, 2007)

Bruce Power Inc.:

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed refurbishment for life extension and continued operations of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station. One-day public hearing (May 19, 2006)

  • Decision to permit the demonstration irradia­tion phase of the Bruce B new fuel project. Abridged hearing (May 19, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Bruce A and Bruce B Nuclear Generating Stations power reactor operating licences to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (July 14, 2006)

  • Decision to accept exemptions sought from the Regulations Amending the Nuclear Security Regulations. Closed hearing (December 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A power reactor operating licence. Abridged hearing (March 9, 2007)

  • Decision to amend the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B power reactor operating licence. Abridged hearing (March 9, 2007)

Hydro-Québec:

  • Decision to amend the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station power reactor operating licence for the temporary amendment to the operating policies and principles. Abridged hearing (August 3, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station operating licence with respect to the implementation of re-qualification testing of certified shift personnel. Abridged hearing (September 14, 2006)

  • Decision to renew the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station operating licence. Two-day public hearing (August 16 and November 7, 2006)

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed modifications to the Gentilly Radioactive Waste Management Facilities and the refurbishment and continued operation of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station until 2035. One-day public hearing (November 7 and 8, 2006)

  • Decision to grant the exemptions sought from the Regulations Amending the Nuclear Security Regulations. Closed hearing (December 14, 2006)

La Corporation de l’École Polytechnique:

  • Decision to renew the subcritical nuclear assembly operating licence for the facility located in Montréal, Québec. One-day public hearing (May 18, 2006)

New Brunswick Power Nuclear Corporation:

  • Decision to renew the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station operating licence. Two-day public hearing (February 16 and May 18, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station operating licence to reflect updates in documentation and increase quantity limit of a sealed source. Abridged hearing (October 5, 2006)

  • Decision to grant exemptions sought from the Regulations Amending the Nuclear Security Regulations. Closed hearing (December 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (February 16, 2007)

Ontario Power Generation Inc.:

  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (July 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (July 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station B power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (July 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station operating licence with respect to the implementation of re-qualification testing of certified shift personnel. Abridged hearing (September 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A operating licence with respect to the implementation of re-qualification testing of certified shift personnel. Abridged hearing (September 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station B Operating Licence with respect to the implementation of re-qualification testing of certified shift personnel. Abridged hearing (September 14, 2006)

  • Decision to grant exemptions sought from the Regulations Amending the Nuclear Security Regulations. Closed hearing (December 14, 2006)

  • Decision to accept environmental assessment guidelines (scope of project and assessment) for the proposed refurbishment and continued operation of Pickering B Reactors at the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Station. One-day public hearing (January 24, 2007)

  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (February 16, 2007)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (February 16, 2007)

  • Decision to amend the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station B power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation. Abridged hearing (February 16, 2007)

Class IB Nuclear Facilities

Cameco Corporation:

  • Decision to renew the nuclear fuel facility operating licence for the conversion facility located in Port Hope, Ontario. Two-day public hearing (October 5 and November 28 and 29, 2006)

  • Decision to renew the nuclear fuel facility operating licence for the refinery located in Blind River, Ontario. Two-day public hearing (October 5 and December 13, 2006)

  • Decision to accept the screening environmental assessment for the proposed modification to the operation of the Blind River refinery incinerator. Abridged hearing (December 7, 2006)

588972 Alberta Limited, operated as Enviropac:

  • Decision to confirm the Designated Officer Order issued to 588972 Alberta Limited on September 15, 2006. Opportunity to be heard (December 14, 2006)

MDS Nordion:

  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of the nuclear substance processing facility. Abridged hearing (June 29, 2006)

SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc.:

  • Decision to modify reporting requirements for the nuclear substance processing facility located in Pembroke, Ontario. Abridged hearing (July 14, 2006)

  • Decision to amend the Designated Officer Order issued to SRBT on August 15, 2006. Opportunity to be heard (August 28, 2006)

  • Decision not to renew the operating licence for the gaseous tritium light source facility located in Pembroke, Ontario. Two-day public hearing (October 25 and November 27, 2006)

Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.:

  • Decision to renew the Class IB nuclear fuel facility operating licence for the nuclear fuel bundle fabricating facility located in Port Hope, Ontario. Two-day public hearing (October 4 and November 30, 2006)

trIUMF Accelerators Inc.:

  • Decision to renew the operating licence for the trIUMF particle accelerator facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia. Two-day public hearing (December 13 and March 7, 2007)

Uranium Mines and Mills

AREVA Resources Canada Inc.:

  • Decision to accept screening environmental assessment for the proposed ferric sulphate production at the McClean Lake Operation. Abridged hearing (October 25, 2006)

Cameco Corporation:

  • Decision to amend the Key Lake Operation uranium mill operating licence. One-day public hearing (January 25, 2007)

COGEMA Resources Inc.:

  • Decision to amend licences to reflect the name change from COGEMA Resources Inc. to AREVA Resources Canada Inc. Abridged hear‑ing (May 19, 2006)

Rio Algom Limited:

  • Decision to amend the financial guarantee for the historic closed mine sites in Elliot Lake, Ontario. Abridged hearing (September 14, 2006)

  • Decision to accept screening environmental assessment for the proposed replacement of the Stanleigh Effluent Treatment Plant. Abridged hearing (March 7, 2007)

Waste Management Facilities

Cameco Corporation:

  • Decision to amend the Beaver Lodge Waste Facility operating licence to extend the expiry date. One-day public hearing (January 25, 2007)

Hydro-Québec:

  • Decision to amend the radioactive waste facility operating licence for the facility located in Bécancour, Québec. One-day public hearing (March 7, 2007)

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office:

  • Decision to accept screening environmental assessment for the proposed Port Hope long­term low-level radioactive waste management project. Abridged hearing (January 24, 2007)

Ontario Power Generation Inc.:

  • Decision on the report and recommendation to the federal Minister of the Environment for the environmental assessment regarding the proposal to construct and operate a deep geologic repository within the Bruce Nuclear Site in Kincardine, Ontario. One-day public hearing (October 23, 2006)

1 The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission staff and organization in general is referred to as the CNSC. The tribunal component is called the Commission, and CNSC staff denotes the staff component.

2 Class I nuclear facilities are defined in the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations.