RAD FACTS about Irradiated Fuel Bays. Learn how irradiated fuel keeps its cool in Canada. An illustration of an irradiated fuel bay filled with water and fuel bundles. Around the bay and in the water there are ten text blocks describing interesting facts about irradiated fuel bays. Depth marks are indicated on the right side of the pool. This illustration explains why these bays are used and how they work. Pools are inspected regularly,under the supervision of Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission specialists. Pools are inspected regularly,under the supervision of Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission specialists. Bays are 6 - 8 m deep(Olympic diving pools are only 5 m deep). Bays areconstructed tomeet seismicstandards. Watertemperatureis 28 to31˚C. The fuelis coveredby 3 to 5 mof water. Used nuclear fuel produces several types of ionizing radiation, some of which can easily penetrate matter. Therefore, the fuel needs to be shielded.Water is an excellent shielding agent because it is relatively dense (1g/mL) anduniform. Water also acts as a good cooling agent.One metre of water decreases the dose to a worker by a factor of 100,000. Three metres of water decreases the dose by a factor of 10 trillion. Used nuclear fuel produces several types of ionizing radiation, some of which can easily penetrate matter. Therefore, the fuel needs to be shielded.Water is an excellent shielding agent because it is relatively dense (1g/mL) anduniform. Water also acts as a good cooling agent.One metre of water decreases the dose to a worker by a factor of 100,000. Three metres of water decreases the dose by a factor of 10 trillion. After being removed from the reactors, irradiated fuelbundles are stored for 7 to 10 years in in-ground pools of water, which provide cooling and shielding, until it is safe to move them to dry storage. RAD FACTS about Irradiated Fuel Bays 1 m deep 3 m deep 5 m deep 4 m deep 6 m deep 7 m deep 2 m deep