Fact or Fiction: Uranium Mining - CNSC Online

Fact or Fiction: Uranium Mining

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Fact or Fiction

Table of Contents

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Fact or Fiction

I’m All Natural

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After the available uranium ore has been mined, all Canadian mines are simply closed down and fenced off.

Canadian law requires all uranium-mining companies to conduct extensive decommissioning and return their sites to a natural state. The CNSC requires facility operators to maintain adequate financial guarantees to cover cleanup and monitoring of sites after they are closed. A financial guarantee is an important condition of a CNSC licence.

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Fact or Fiction

Best in the West

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The world's richest uranium deposits are found in Western Australia.

Saskatchewan has the world's richest uranium deposits with ore grades up to 100 times the world average.

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Fact or Fiction

Designated Miner

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The Nuclear Safety and Control Act designates uranium mines and mills as nuclear facilities.

A CNSC licence is required to prepare a site, construct, operate, decommission or abandon a uranium mine or mill.

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Fact or Fiction

Homegrown Power

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Canadian uranium mines provide 5% of the world's uranium supply.

Canadian uranium mines located in northern Saskatchewan provide 25% of the world's supply.

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Fact or Fiction

Radiation Watch

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Uranium mining in Canada releases harmful radiation.

CNSC staff verify that activities at uranium mines and mills are carried out in a way that is safe and ensures that radiation doses to workers and the public are below radiation dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable.

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Fact or Fiction

Proximity Alert!

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Workers and the public living near uranium mines are as healthy as the general Canadian population.

Studies show that workers and the public living near uranium mines are as healthy as the general Canadian population. The health risk to miners working in modern uranium mines from radiation exposure is low. This is because over the last 60 years we have learned how to keep workers radiation doses very low.

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Fact or Fiction

Heavy Responsibilities

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Today's uranium mining and processing activities will place a heavy burden on future generations.

The CNSC requires facility operators to maintain adequate financial guarantees to cover cleanup and monitoring of sites during operations and after they are closed. A financial guarantee is an important condition of a CNSC licence.

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Fact or Fiction

Saskatchew #1?

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The world's richest uranium deposits are located in northern Saskatchewan.

Fourteen percent of the world's known uranium resources are located in northern Saskatchewan where ore grades are up 100 times the world average.

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Fact or Fiction

Responsible or Reckless?

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Uranium exploration causes dangerous levels of radiation to be released.

Typical uranium exploration methods, such as drilling small core samples, pose a negligible to zero risk of increasing exposure to radiation, including radon.

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Fact or Fiction: Uranium Mining

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