CNSC Online - Fact or Fiction: History and Regulations

Fact or Fiction: History and Regulations

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Fact or Fiction

Table of contents

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Fact or Fiction

First or Last?

AECB/CNSC President Dr. Agnes Bishop, with a member of the IAEA, signed the Convention on                      Nuclear Safety on Canada's behalf. logo
AECB/CNSC President Dr. Agnes Bishop, with a member of the IAEA, signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety on Canada's behalf.
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Canada was one of the first countries to sign the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in 1996.

Canada was one of the first signatories of the Convention, and has been one of the staunchest promoters and supporters of its objectives. The CNSC prepares Canada's national reports required under the Convention and participates in the Convention's review meetings, which take place every three years.

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Fact or Fiction

Minting Words

Henri Becquerel 1896
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Radiation was discovered during the 20th century.

Radiation was discovered and named by French scientist Henri Becquerel in 1896. Becquerel's student, Marie Curie, coined the term radiation.

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Fact or Fiction

Miracle Prices

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Radium, a radioactive element often found in the same ores as uranium, was the most valuable substance in the world during the 1920s.

Radium was believed to be a miracle cure for cancer and commanded prices as high as $120,000 per gram during the 1920s-more than any precious metal or gem.

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Fact or Fiction

Planetary Influence

NASA - Hubble Observatory
Photo credit: NASA - Hubble Observatory
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Uranium is named after the planet Uranus.

Uranium was discovered by German chemist Martin Klaproth in 1789 and named in honour of the planet Uranus, which had been discovered eight years earlier.

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Fact or Fiction

Live Action

CNSC Public Hearing
CNSC Public Hearing
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All public Commission hearings are broadcast and archived online.

Did you know that you can also participate in or observe a Commission Tribunal hearing, an environmental assessment, or comment on a draft Regulatory Document or a Proposed Amendment to a Regulation? You can also attend CNSC 101 Information Sessions for Stakeholders.

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Fact or Fiction

Sshh..or shout?

A public information session in Port Hope, Ontario
A public information session in Port Hope, Ontario
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The CNSC is secretive in its dealings with Canada's nuclear energy sector.

The CNSC has an obligation to provide Canadians with full information about activities taking place in the nuclear sector, including its dealings those who hold nuclear licenses.

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Fact or Fiction

Here. There. Everywhere?

CNSC inspector having a look at a fueling machine in the reactor vault
CNSC inspector having a look at a fueling machine in the reactor vault
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CNSC inspectors are located across the country at headquarter, regional offices and site offices.

The CNSC has four regional offices- in Calgary, Saskatoon, Laval and Mississauga-a and site offices at Canada's five nuclear power sites and Chalk River Laboratories.

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Fact or Fiction

Over or Under?

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Radiation doses to the public and the environment from nuclear activities are consistently below the CNSC's limits for safety.

For every year that radiation doses have been measured, they have been well below CNSC limits. The CNSC enforces strict limits for how much radiation a person or the environment can be exposed to without harm.

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Fact or Fiction

Casual Reports?

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Licensees file reports about their activities only when an incident occurs.

Licensees must file mandatory reports according to the terms of their licences.

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Fact or Fiction: History and Regulations

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