Fact or Fiction: Radiation History - CNSC Online

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Table of Contents

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Radiating Radiation

logo
score

Nuclear radiation comes from the nucleus of unstable atoms.

Nuclear radiation is energy in the form of sub-atomic particles (protons, neutrons and electrons), or electromagnetic waves that come from the nucleus of some atoms as they change or decay into more stable forms.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Indivisible

logo
score

The Greek origin of the word “atom” means “that which cannot be divided”.

The early Greek philosophers called the smallest piece of matter “atomon” but this was long before atoms and their properties were understood. We now know that the atom is made up of many parts, and physicists use smaller and smaller particles to probe them to an increasingly fine level of detail.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

A - B - C

logo
score

Three types of nuclear radiation were named after Greek letters.

Alpha, beta and gamma, the first three letters in the Greek alphabet, are the three primary types of radiation that can be emitted through nuclear decay.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Hot Discovery

logo
score

Radiation was discovered during the 20th century.

Radiation was discovered and named by French scientist Henri Becquerel in 1896. Becquerel’s student, Marie Curie, coined the term “radiation.”

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Mystery Rays

logo
score

X-rays got their name because they were not understood at the time of their discovery.

In 1895, Wilhelm Röntgen, who was the first to closely study X-rays, gave them their name because he didn't know what they were. In many countries, including his native Germany, they are commonly called Röntgen rays.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

The Price Is Right

logo
score

Radium, a radioactive element often found in the same ore bodies as uranium, was the most valuable substance in the world during the 1920s.

Radium was believed to be a miracle cure for cancer and commanded prices as high as $120,000 per gram during the 1920s – more than any other precious metal or gem.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

First in Line

AECB/CNSC President Dr. Agnes Bishop logo
AECB/CNSC President Dr. Agnes Bishop, with a member of the IAEA, signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety on Canada's behalf.
score

Canada was one of the first countries to sign the Convention on Nuclear Safety, in 1996.

Canada was one of the first signatories of the Convention, and has been one of the staunchest promoters and supporters of its objectives. The CNSC prepares Canada's national reports required under the Convention and participates in the Convention's review meetings, which take place every three years.

Fact or Fiction: Radiation History

Your Score